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Russia suggests that an expected US report that could sanction Kremlin-linked oligarchs is an attempt to influence its March presidential election.

The treasury department report is expected to detail the closeness of senior Russian political figures and oligarchs to President Vladimir Putin, who is standing for re-election.

US officials accuse Russia of meddling in the 2016 US presidential elections.

Russia has repeatedly denied the allegations.

President Putin’s spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, said the forthcoming report would be analyzed.

During 2017, President Donald Trump enacted new sanctions on Russia but he accused Congress of overreaching itself and preventing him from easing penalties on Russia in the future.

President Trump has repeatedly rejected any allegations that his campaign staff colluded with Russia to help him defeat Democratic rival Hillary Clinton at the November 2016 presidential election.

The allegations voiced by the US intelligence community are currently being investigated by Congress and Robert Mueller.

Dmitry Peskov said the US report was a “direct and obvious attempt to influence the elections” on March 18.

However, the spokesman added that he was sure the list would not affect the vote.

Russia Election Hacking: Robert Mueller Likely to Interview Donald Trump

Donald Trump: “President Putin Feels Insulted by Allegations of Russian Interference in US Election”

The Kremlin has pledged to help limit further damage to Russian oligarchs and businesses that could be on the list.

In 2018, President Vladimir Putin reportedly met top businessmen behind closed doors to discuss the issue.

Vladimir Putin is seen as the clear favorite to win the March elections.

His main opposition rival, Alexei Navalny, has been barred from standing in the race.

Alexei Navalny was briefly detained during a protest rally on January 28.

The US treasury department has to finalize the document on January 29, after which it is expected to hand the report over to Congress.

It is not known whether the names of those on the list will be publicly revealed or kept secret or indeed how many people and entities are on the list.

Being on the list does not automatically trigger sanctions but such penalties could be activated any time later by the United States.


An explosion at a store in Sankt Petersburg, Russia, has injured at least ten people.

According to officials, one person was said to be in serious condition after the detonation of an improvised explosive device (IED).

Russian President Vladimir Putin described the explosion, at the Perekrestok supermarket chain on December 27, as a terrorist act.

No group has said it carried out the attack, which officials say produced a blast equivalent to 200g (7oz) of TNT.

Russia’s investigative committee said the home-made device was packed with lethal components.

Image source Wikipedia

St Petersburg Subway Explosion Kills 11

The explosion took place in an area of the supermarket that housed lockers for storing bags.

The property was quickly evacuated and there were no reports of a fire, but images circulating on social media in Russia showed extensive damage in an area of the store close to the tills.

President Putin commented on the explosion at a military awards ceremony on December 28. Officials had earlier suggested the attack was being treated as attempted murder.

Earlier this month, Presidents Vladimir Putin and Donald Trump spoke by phone after information provided by the CIA helped Russian security services foil an attack on St Petersburg’s Kazan cathedral.

At the time, Russia’s Interfax news agency reported that a group had been planning attacks at a number of sites. Several people were reportedly detained.

In April, an explosion on the St Petersburg subway system killed at least 13 people and injured more than 50 others.

President Donald Trump said President Vladimir Putin feels insulted by allegations of Russian interference in the 2016 US election.

The two leaders briefly met at the APEC summit in Vietnam.

“He said he absolutely did not meddle in our election,” Donald Trump said.

President Trump, who defeated Democratic rival Hillary Clinton, said the allegations were a “Democratic hit job”.

The US intelligence community concluded earlier that Russia had indeed tried to sway the poll in favor of Donald Trump.

The DoJ has appointed special investigator Robert Mueller to examine any possible collusion involving Donald Trump’s team, and legal action has already been taken against several former aides.

Image NBC News

APEC Summit Vietnam: President Donald Trump Says US Will No Longer Tolerate Chronic Trade Abuse

Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin Had an Undisclosed Meeting at G20 Summit

Russia Hacking Briefing: Vladimir Putin Developed a Clear Preference for Donald Trump

President Trump has refused to acknowledge a reported assessment by the CIA and other intelligence agencies that Russia was behind the hacking of the Democratic National Committee (DNC) in the run-up to the 2016 presidential election.

The contents of the emails, passed to WikiLeaks and posted online, were embarrassing to the Democrats and shook up the presidential campaign, which ended in defeat for Hillary Clinton.

In addition to Robert Mueller’s inquiry, congressional committees have been set up to carry out their own investigations.

Relations between the US and Russia have been strained for years, with the Kremlin long accusing Washington of seeking to sway elections in Russia and other ex-Soviet states including Ukraine and Georgia.

While Russian hackers are widely suspected of involvement, there has been no conclusive link to the Kremlin.

Denying that Russia had tried to interfere last year by fostering contacts with Donald Trump’s campaign, Vladimir Putin told reporters in Vietnam: “Everything about the so-called Russian dossier in the US is a manifestation of a continuing domestic political struggle.”

President Trump said he believed President Putin had been “very insulted by” the allegations and that was “not a good thing” for America.

“He [Vladimir Putin] said he didn’t meddle,” the president added.

“I asked him again.”

Asked if he believed President Putin, Donald Trump replied: “He is very, very strong in the fact that he didn’t do it. You have President Putin very strongly, vehemently says he has nothing to do with that. Now, you are not going to get into an argument, you are going to start talking about Syria and the Ukraine.”


The US ordered Russia to close its San Francisco consulate and two trade missions in response to “unwarranted” Russian action, the State Department has announced.

The San Francisco consulate, and annexes in New York and Washington, must close by September 2.

The State Department’s move follows Moscow’s reduction of US diplomatic staff in Russia last month.

That in turn followed new US sanctions on Russia over Crimea and alleged election interference, which led to the expulsion of 35 Russian diplomats.

In December 2016, former President Barack Obama had ordered those expulsions, along with the closure of two compounds.

Although Russian President Vladimir Putin did not respond initially to that move, with President Trump set to assume office, he then announced on July 31 a reduction of 755 US diplomatic staff in Russia, in retaliation for the US sanctions.

The US diplomats expelled have until September 1 to leave Russia – a day before the US closures of the Russian consulate and two annexes, which are trade missions, must be completed.

Image source Wikimedia

A senior administration official said on August 31 that the consulate and the residence attached to it as well as the two trade missions would close but no Russian staff would be required to leave the US.

Russia will be allowed to maintain the properties, but not use them, the official added.

According to the State Department, the US actions were “in the spirit of parity”. It blamed Russia for what it called a downward spiral in bilateral ties, but suggested it wanted an end to the current spat.

State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said in a statement: “The United States hopes that, having moved toward the Russian Federation’s desire for parity, we can avoid further retaliatory actions by both sides and move forward to achieve the stated goal of both our presidents: improved relations between our two countries and increased co-operation on areas of mutual concern.”

The move leaves each country with three consulates in place, Heather Nauert added.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov spoke to Secretary of State Rex Tillerson in a phone call on August 31, expressing “regret at the escalation of tensions in bilateral relations”.

According to a statement from the Russian foreign ministry, Sergei Lavrov said Moscow would study the order and respond accordingly.

Sergei Lavrov and Rex Tillerson are due to meet in September on the sidelines of the UN General Assembly in New York.

Earlier this month, President Trump said US relations with Russia were at a “dangerous low” amid a row with Congress over the fresh sanctions against Moscow.

The president, who wanted warmer ties with Russia, had opposed the bill, which included a provision that limits his ability to lift sanctions and forces him to consult Congress first.

President Trump has been dogged by claims that Russia tried to sway the election in his favor and several investigations are under way to determine whether anyone from his campaign colluded with Moscow.

However, Russia has repeatedly denied interfering and President Trump has insisted that there was no collusion, calling the investigations a “witch hunt”.

President Vladimir Putin has ordered 755 US diplomatic staff to leave Russia, in retaliation for new US sanctions against Moscow.

The decision to expel staff was made on July 29 , but President Putin has now confirmed the number who must go by September 1.

It brings staff levels to 455, the same as Russia’s complement in Washington.

This is thought to be the largest expulsion of diplomats from any country in modern history.

The number includes Russian employees of the US diplomatic missions across Russia.

House Votes to Impose Fresh Sanctions on Russia

Russia Threatens to Expel 30 US Diplomats in Retaliation for Washington’s Sanctions

Trump Vows To “Move Forward” In Relations With Russia

Staff in the embassy in Moscow as well as the consulates in Ekaterinburg, Vladivostok and St. Petersburg are affected.

Vladimir Putin did strike a conciliatory note, saying he did not want to impose more measures, but also said he could not see ties changing “anytime soon”.

The president told Russian TV: “More than 1,000 people were working and are still working” at the US embassy and consulates, and that “755 people must stop their activities in Russia.”

Russia has also said it is seizing holiday properties and a warehouse used by US diplomats.

Vladimir Putin suggested he could consider more measures, but said: “I am against it as of today.”

The Russian president also noted the creation of a de-escalation zone in southern Syria as an example of a concrete result of working together.

However, in terms of general relations, Vladimir Putin added: “We have waited long enough, hoping that the situation would perhaps change for the better.

“But it seems that even if the situation is changing, it’s not for anytime soon.”

The new US sanctions were in retaliation both for Russia’s annexation of Crimea in 2014 and Russian interference in the US election.

In December, the Obama administration ordered the seizure of two Russian diplomatic compounds and expelled 35 Russian diplomats in response to alleged hacking of the US Democratic Party and Hillary Clinton’s campaign.

The new US sanctions on Russia were overwhelmingly approved by both houses of Congress despite objections from the White House.

US intelligence agencies believe Russia tried to sway the election in favor of President Donald Trump and now there are several investigations looking into whether anyone from his campaign helped.

Russia has always denied interfering and Donald Trump insists there was no collusion.

Presidents Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin had another, previously undisclosed conversation at the G20 summit in Hamburg, the White House has confirmed.

The president and his Russian counterpart spoke towards the end of a formal dinner but the White House has not revealed what was discussed.

Donald Trump has condemned media revelations of the talks as “sick”.

The two leaders’ relationship is under scrutiny amid allegations of Russian interference in the US election.

US intelligence agencies believe Russia tried to tip the election in Donald Trump’s favor, something denied by the Kremlin. Donald Trump has rejected allegations of any collusion.

The extra conversation happened during a private meal of heads of state at the G20 summit earlier in the month.

G20 Hamburg: Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin Meet Face to Face for First Time

President Trump left his seat and headed to Vladimir Putin, who had been sitting next to Melania Trump, media said. The president was alone with Vladimir Putin, apart from the attendance of the Russian president’s official interpreter.

Donald Trump had been seated next to Japanese PM Shinzo Abe’s wife, so the US interpreter at the dinner spoke Japanese, not Russian. No media were in attendance.

The length of the talks has been disputed.

Ian Bremmer, president of the US-based Eurasia Group, who first reported them in a newsletter to clients, said: “Donald Trump got up from the table and sat down with Putin for about an hour. It was very animated and very friendly.”

No-one else was nearby, so the topics of discussion were not known, he said.

Image NBC News

Ian Bremmer had not been at the dinner but said details were given to him by unnamed attendees who, he said, were “flummoxed, confused and startled” by the turn of events.

He told Bloomberg he had never before seen “two major countries with a constellation of national interests that are as dissident while the two leaders seem to be doing everything possible to make nice-nice and be close to each other”.

In a statement, a senior White House official said there was no “second meeting”, just a brief conversation after dinner.

The official said: “The insinuation that the White House has tried to <hide> a second meeting is false, malicious and absurd. It is not merely perfectly normal, it is part of a president’s duties, to interact with world leaders.”

National Security Council spokesman Michael Anton said it was not a meeting but a “pull aside”, adding: “A conversation over dessert should not be characterized as a meeting.”

President Trump later said on Twitter: “Fake News story of secret dinner with Putin is <sick>. All G20 leaders, and spouses, were invited by the Chancellor of Germany. Press knew!”

The dinner and its attendees have always been known. Only the Trump-Putin discussion had not been reported before.

At the earlier, formal meeting, their first face-to-face encounter, President Trump said he had repeatedly pressed President Putin about the allegations of interference in the US vote.

“I said, <Did you do it?> He said, <No, I did not, absolutely not>. I then asked him a second time, in a totally different way. He said, <Absolutely not>.”

There are congressional investigations, and one by a special counsel, into the allegations of Russian interference in the US election and possible collusion with the Trump team.

On July 18, the Senate intelligence committee said it wanted to interview Donald Trump’s son, Donald Jr., and other members of the Trump team, over a meeting they had with a Russian lawyer in June 2016.

Donald Trump Jr. said he had attended the meeting with Natalia Veselnitskaya as he was promised damaging material on Hillary Clinton, but it did not materialize.

On July 19, Natalia Veselnitskaya told Russia’s RT TV channel she would be willing to testify before the Senate on the matter.

Meanwhile, the White House said President Trump would nominate former Utah governor Jon Huntsman as ambassador to Russia, a key post for a president who promised to improve relations with Moscow.

Jon Huntsman, who served as ambassador to China and Singapore, needs to have his name confirmed by the Senate.

The suspicions over Russian interference are likely to play a significant factor in his confirmation process, correspondents say.


Russia is threatening to expel about 30 US diplomats and seize US state property in retaliation for Washington’s sanctions, local officials confirm.

The threat came from Russian foreign ministry sources, quoted by the daily Izvestia. Other Russian officials have made similar statements recently.

In December 2016, the Obama administration expelled 35 Russian diplomats and shut down two intelligence compounds.

The measures were a response to alleged Russian meddling in the US election.

Russia was already under US sanctions.

Former President Barack Obama acted against Russia after US intelligence sources had accused Russian state agents of hacking into Democratic Party computers to undermine Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign.

Trump Vows To “Move Forward” In Relations With Russia

President Vladimir Putin raised the issue of the Obama sanctions with President Donald Trump when they met in Hamburg last week, Izvestia reported.

Meanwhile, the Trump team is under investigation over alleged Russian collusion during last year’s presidential campaign. Russia has strongly denied interfering in the election.

In addition to expelling 35 Russian diplomats from Washington and San Francisco, the Obama administration imposed sanctions on nine entities and individuals including Russia’s GRU and FSB intelligence agencies. The US closed Russian intelligence compounds in New York and Maryland.

Donald Trump Jr. Admits Meeting Russian Lawyer During Campaign

President Putin refrained from tit-for-tat retaliation – unlike in previous diplomatic spats.

Russia says President Donald Trump presented “no plan to resolve the crisis” when the issue was raised in Hamburg.

An unnamed Russian diplomat told Izvestia that in retaliation Russia could seize a US government dacha (country villa) at Serebryany Bor, to the northwest of Moscow, and a US warehouse in the city itself.

Donald Trump Shifts His Position on Working with Russia for A Joint Cyber Security Unity

However, the US ambassador’s Spaso House residence and the Anglo-American School in St Petersburg would not be affected.

Russia would carry out the threat if no compromise was reached at a St Petersburg meeting later this month between Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov and US Under Secretary of State Thomas Shannon, Izvestia reported.

The US and its Western allies have also imposed wide-ranging sanctions on Russia because of Moscow’s role in the Ukraine conflict.

Russia blocked most imported Western food and drink in retaliation.


President Donald Trump has backtracked on a proposal to work with Russia to create an “impenetrable” cyber security unit to prevent election hacking.

Hours after promoting the idea on July 9, Donald Trump said that he did not think it could actually happen.

The idea of a partnership with Russia was ridiculed by senior Republicans.

It comes after President Trump’s first face-to-face talks with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Germany on July 7, in which the pair discussed the issue.

G20 Hamburg: Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin Meet Face to Face for First Time

President Trump described the outcome of the talks as positive and suggested closer co-operation between the two nations.

“Putin and I discussed forming an impenetrable cyber security unit so that election hacking, and many other negative things, will be guarded and safe,” he said.

The initial proposal immediately prompted derision from Democrats, as well as some Republicans who questioned why the US would work with Russia after the Kremlin’s alleged meddling in the 2016 US election.

Russia Hacking Briefing: Vladimir Putin Developed a Clear Preference for Donald Trump

President Trump shifted his position on the next day, saying on Twitter: “The fact that President Putin and I discussed a cyber security unit doesn’t mean I think it can happen. It can’t.”

However, the president stressed that another issue discussed in his talks with Vladimir Putin, a ceasefire in south-western Syria, had come into effect.

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin had sought to defend the proposed cyber unit after President Trump’s initial announcement.

Speaking on ABC’s This Week, Steve Mnuchin described it as a “significant accomplishment” for President Trump.

“What we want to make sure is that we co-ordinate with Russia,” he added.

Rex Tillerson Hearing: Trump’s Pick for Secretary of State Accepts Vladimir Putin Knew of Russian Hacking

However, Republican Senator Marco Rubio suggested that such an initiative would be like partnering with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad on chemical weapons.

Republican Senator Lindsey Graham said: “It’s not the dumbest idea I’ve ever heard, but it’s pretty close.”

A special prosecutor is investigating whether Trump associates colluded with alleged Russian efforts to influence the 2016 US election.

Both Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin said the allegations had been discussed.

However, the two sides described the content of the meeting differently.

President Trump said he “strongly pressed” the issue with Vladimir Putin, who had “vehemently denied” interfering in the US election.

The president also said it was time to work more “constructively” with Russia.

Vladimir Putin said he believed President Trump had accepted his assurances that Moscow had not interfered in the vote.

However, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said interference in the 2016 election remained an impediment to better relations with Russia, while the US ambassador to the UN, Nikki Haley, said the US “can’t trust Russia” and “won’t ever trust Russia”.


President Donald Trump has criticized China following North Korea’s test of a long-range missile, condemning it for increasing trade with Pyongyang.

He tweeted: “So much for China working with us.”

Meanwhile, the US and South Korea conducted a ballistic missile fire exercise in the Sea of Japan in response to North Korea’s action.

China and Russia have urged both sides to stop flexing their military muscle and said they oppose any attempts at regime change in North Korea.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said: “It is perfectly clear to Russia and China that any attempts to justify the use of force by referring to [United Nations] Security Council resolutions are unacceptable, and will lead to unpredictable consequences in this region which borders both the Russian Federation and the People’s Republic of China.”

“Attempts to strangle the DPRK [North Korea] economically are equally unacceptable,” he added.

North Korea Claims It Successfully Tested ICBM

North Korea’s missile launch, the latest in a series of tests, was in defiance of a ban by the UN Security Council.

Image source YouTube

The US has asked for an urgent meeting of the Security Council to discuss the issue. A closed-door session of the 15-member body will take place later on July 5.

President Trump held talks with Chinese President Xi Jinping at his Mar-a-Lago retreat in Florida in April.

After those meetings, President Trump hailed “tremendous progress” with China.

North Korea Tests New Rocket Engine

The trade figures showing an increase in trade between China and North Korea, which he was apparently referring to in July 5 critical tweet.

President Trump is now en route to Poland and Germany, where he will meet President Xi Jinping for the second time.

China, which is North Korea’s main economic ally, and Russia have called on the North to suspend its ballistic missile program in exchange for a halt on the large-scale military exercises by the US and South Korea.

President Xi and Russian President Vladimir Putin, who met in Moscow on July 4, said “the opposing sides should start negotiations”.

On July 4, Japan said “repeated provocations like this are absolutely unacceptable” and lodged a protest.

President Donald Trump has accused the Obama administration of inaction over alleged Russian interference in the last year’s election.

President Trump said President Obama had learned well before the November 8 poll about the accusations and “did nothing”.

Donald Trump’s comments followed an article in the Washington Post which said that Barack Obama learned last August of President Vladimir Putin’s “direct involvement”.

Vladimir Putin has repeatedly denied any Russian interference into the presidential election.

According to the Washington Post article, President Obama was told early last August by sources deep within the Russian government that President Putin was directly involved in a cyber campaign to disrupt the election, injure Hillary Clinton and aid a Trump victory.

Image source AP

The Post said Barack Obama secretly debated dozens of options to punish Russia but in the end settled on what it called symbolic measures – the expulsion of 35 diplomats and closure of two Russian compounds. They came in late December, well after the election.

The paper reported that Barack Obama was concerned he might himself be seen as trying to manipulate the election.

The Post quoted a former administration official as saying: “From national security people there was a sense of immediate introspection, of, <<Wow, did we mishandle this>>.”

Measures President Obama had considered but which were not put into action included planting cyber weapons in the Russian infrastructure and releasing information personally damaging to Vladimir Putin.

President Trump tweeted on June 23: “The Obama Administration knew far in advance of November 8th about election meddling by Russia. Did nothing about it. WHY?”

The president followed that up with two more tweets on June 24, the second saying: “Obama Administration official said they “choked” when it came to acting on Russian meddling of election. They didn’t want to hurt Hillary?”

Donald Trump repeats the argument in an interview with Fox News, which will air on June 25.

“If he had the information, why didn’t he do something about it? He should have done something about it. But you don’t read that. It’s quite sad.”

Allegations of collusion between the Trump team and Moscow officials during the election have dogged the president’s first five months in office.

Donald Trump has repeatedly denied the allegations, calling the investigations a “witch hunt”.

US investigators are looking into whether Russian cyber hackers targeted the electoral systems to help Donald Trump win.

Media say special counsel Robert Mueller is also investigating Donald Trump for possible obstruction of justice over the Russia inquiries.

They involve Donald Trump’s firing of FBI Director James Comey, who led one of the inquiries, and President Trump’s alleged attempt to end a probe into sacked national security adviser Mike Flynn.

A Russian computer programmer has been arrested in Spain for alleged involvement in “hacking” the US election, Spanish media reported.

The man, named as Pyotr Levashov, was arrested on April 7 in Barcelona. He has now been remanded in custody.

A “legal source” also told the AFP that Pyotr Levashov was the subject of an extradition request by the US.

The request is due to be examined by Spain’s national criminal court, the agency added.

Image source Getty Images

Spanish news website El Confidencial has said that Pyotr Levashov’s arrest warrant was issued by US authorities over suspected “hacking” that helped Donald Trump’s campaign.

Pyotr Levashov’s wife Maria also told Russian broadcaster RT that the arrest was made in connection with such allegations.

Several cybersecurity experts have also linked Pyotr Levashov to a Russian spam kingpin, who uses the alias Peter Severa.

A US intelligence report released in January alleged that President Vladimir Putin tried to help Donald Trump to victory.

Donald Trump later commented that the outcome of the election had not been affected.

The report said that Russia’s objectives were to “undermine public faith” in the US democratic process and “denigrate” Donald Trump’s rival Hillary Clinton.

Russia’s efforts to this end allegedly included hacking into email accounts used by the Democratic National Committee; using intermediaries such as WikiLeaks to release hacked information; and funding social media users or “trolls” to make nasty comments.

However, there were no details of Vladimir Putin’s alleged involvement with such interference in the report.

Vladimir Putin has strongly denied allegations that Russia tried to influence the US election.


Another 31 people have been arrested during opposition protests in Moscow, the second Sunday in succession to see such demonstrations.

Last week, at least 1,000 people were detained during protests in Moscow, reportedly the largest in five years.

Russian opposition has called for the resignation of PM Dmitry Medvedev over corruption allegations.

A smaller group of about 100 people began marching through Moscow on April 2, but were blocked by police.

While police said 31 people had been arrested for “breaches of public order”, OVD-Info, a website monitoring detentions, said 56 people including four minors were arrested.

Those who organized the protest via social media are now facing an investigation.

Image source AFP

March 26 demonstrations in Moscow and across Russia were prompted by main opposition leader Alexei Navalny, who was later arrested.

Police said 500 people were held, but OVD-Info said at least 1,000 people were arrested in Moscow alone.

Alexei Navalny had published reports claiming that Dmitry Medvedev controlled mansions, yachts and vineyards – a fortune that far outstripped his official salary.

PM Dmitry Medvedev’s spokeswoman called the allegations “propagandistic attacks”, but the prime minister himself has not commented on the claims.

Alexei Navalny has announced his intention to run for president in 2018 against Vladimir Putin. However, he is barred from doing so after being found guilty in a case he said was politicized.

The opposition leader was sentenced to 15 days in prison for his role in March 26 demonstrations. His spokesman said on Twitter that he had nothing to do with the new protest.

Organizers told news agencies that they had planned to march towards the Kremlin on April 2 when they were stopped by police.

Russia’s Interfax news agency reported that about 400 people had taken part in an authorized anti-corruption rally in the Siberian city of Novosibirsk.

A Senate panel investigating alleged Russian interference in the US election has vowed a thorough inquiry.

The pledge comes as a similar inquiry in the House remains mired in acrimony.

The Senate hearing began on March 30. President Donald Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, is set to appear next week.

In the hearing’s opening remarks chairman Republican Richard Burr said “we are all targets of a sophisticated and capable adversary”.

Ranking Democrat Mark Warner said “Russia sought to hijack our democratic process” by employing a disinformation campaign on social media, which he describes as “Russian propaganda on steroids”.

Mark Warner said March 30 session would examine how Russia may have used technology to spread disinformation in the US, including the possible generation of fake news for voters in key states, such as Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania.

“We are in a whole new realm around cyber that provides opportunity for huge, huge threats to our basic democracy,” he said.

“You are seeing it right now.”

Image source Getty Images

Former NSA director Keith Alexander will be one of those testifying on March 30.

Jared Kushner, who is married to President Trump’s daughter, Ivanka, volunteered to speak to the Senate Intelligence Committee, the White House has said, and is scheduled to appear next week.

Committee chairman Richard Burr said the panel would not shy away from the truth.

“This investigation’s scope will go wherever the intelligence leads,” he said.

When asked if he had seen any links between Donald Trump and Russian interference, he said: “We know that our challenge is to answer that question for the American people.”

Richard Burr said that there had been “conversations” about interviewing Michael Flynn – who was sacked by President Trump as national security adviser for misleading the vice-president over his contacts with the Russian ambassador – but his appearance is not confirmed.

The Trump presidency has been unable to shake off allegations that members of its team colluded with Russian officials during the election campaign. The president has regularly dismissed the claims as “fake news” and Russia has also ridiculed the allegations.

President Vladimir Putin did so again on March 30 at an Arctic forum, describing them as “nonsense”.

Richard Burr was a security adviser to the Trump campaign but insists he remains objective.

The House Intelligence Committee’s inquiry into the matter has been beset by partisan disputes.

Ranking Democrat Adam Schiff has insisted panel chairman Devin Nunes remove himself, after accusing him of colluding with the White House.

Last week, Devin Nunes went straight to the White House after hearing allegations about surveillance of Donald Trump’s team, rather than sharing them with Democrat colleagues on the panel.

Devin Nunes later apologized but insists he remains an objective chairman and will not step down.

As well as the two houses of Congress, the FBI is also conducting an investigation into the matter.


The EU has demanded the release “without delay” of more than 500 people detained in protests across Russia on March 26.

The US state department also said protesters should be able to “exercise their rights without fear of retribution”.

The protesters urged Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev to quit over corruption allegations.

Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny, who called the protests and was one of those arrested, appeared at court on March 27.

Alexei Navalny, 40, tweeted from the building: “Hello everyone from Tversky Court. The time will come when we will have them on trial (but honestly).”

He also said that PM Dmitry Medvedev should be summoned by the court as the chief organizer of the protests.

Alexei Navalny has yet to go before a judge but is likely to face charges relating to organizing banned protests and could be held for 15 days.

March 26 protests drew thousands of protesters nationwide, including in Saint Petersburg, Vladivostok, Novosibirsk, Tomsk and several other cities, as well as Moscow.

At least 500 protesters were detained. Most of the marches were organized without official permission.

TV footages showed demonstrators chanting “Down with [Russian President Vladimir] Putin!”, “Russia without Putin!” and “Putin is a thief!”.

Correspondents say the marches appear to be the biggest since anti-government demonstrations in 2011 and 2012.

An EU spokesman said the Russian police action had “prevented the exercise of basic freedoms of expression, association and peaceful assembly, which are fundamental rights enshrined in the Russian constitution”.

The statement added: “We call on the Russian authorities to abide fully by the international commitments it has made… and to release without delay the peaceful demonstrators that have been detained.”

State Department spokesman Mark Toner said in a statement: “The Russian people, like people everywhere, deserve a government that supports an open marketplace of ideas, transparent and accountable governance, equal treatment under the law, and the ability to exercise their rights without fear of retribution.”

Alexei Navalny called for the nationwide protests after he published reports claiming that PM Dmitry Medvedev controlled mansions, yachts and vineyards – a fortune that suggests income that far outstrips his official salary.

His report, posted on YouTube, has been viewed more than 11 million times.

It includes the accusation that Dmitry Medvedev had a special house for a duck on one of his properties – and on March 26, some demonstrators held up images of yellow rubber ducks.

Others showed up with their faces painted green, a reference to a recent attack in which Alexei Navalny was hit with green liquid.



Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny has been arrested at an anti-corruption protest he organized in Moscow.

Thousands of people joined rallies nationwide, calling for the resignation of PM Dmitry Medvedev over corruption allegations.

At least 500 other protesters were detained in Moscow and across Russia.

Most of the marches were illegal, organized without official permission.

TV footages showed demonstrators chanting “Down with [Vladimir] Putin!”, “Russia without Putin!” and “Putin is a thief!”.

Correspondents say the marches appear to be the biggest since anti-government demonstrations in 2011 and 2012.

Alexei Navalny was detained as he arrived to join the rally in central Moscow. Protesters then tried to prevent a police van from taking him away.

Image source Wikimedia

In a tweet after his detention, Alexei Navalny urged fellow protesters to continue with the demonstration.

He said: “Guys, I’m fine. No need to fight to get me out. Walk along Tverskaya [Moscow main street]. Our topic of the day is the fight against corruption.”

Alexei Navalny later said police stormed the office of his foundation and detained its staff, who were broadcasting the protests live.

Demonstrations were also held in Saint Petersburg, Vladivostok, Novosibirsk, Tomsk and several other cities, where arrests had also been reported.

In Moscow, protesters filled Pushkin square and some climbed the monument to poet Alexander Pushkin shouting “impeachment”. Turnout was estimated to be between 7,000 and 8,000, according to police.

The police said 500 protesters had been arrested in the capital alone, but a rights group, OVD Info, put that number at least 700.

The Kremlin has not commented on the demonstrations. It had said on Friday that plans for an unauthorized protest in central Moscow were an illegal provocation.

State TV channels did not cover the demonstrations.

Local media reports suggested the authorities pressured students not to attend. In some cities, exams were scheduled on March 26.

Alexei Navalny announced his intention to run for president in 2018 against Vladimir Putin.

However, he is barred from doing so after being found guilty in a case he said was politicized.

Alexei Navalny said on his website that protests were planned in 99 cities, but that in 72 of them authorities did not give permission.


Alexei Navalny has been found guilty of embezzlement, Russian media report.

A judge was still reading the verdict in the city of Kirov, but news agencies said it was clear in his remarks that the Russian leading opposition leader had been convicted.

Even a suspended sentence would bar the outspoken critic of President Vladimir Putin from running for president in 2018.

Alexei Navalny, 40, has denied the accusations, saying the case is politically motivated.

A sentence in the retrial may take hours to be read out. Prosecutors had asked the judge to hand Alexei Navalny a five year suspended sentence.

The European Court of Human Rights ordered a retrial after it said he was not given a fair hearing in the first trial, in 2013.

Alexei Navalny is known for his anti-corruption campaign, which targeted senior officials close to the Kremlin. He says the case is an effort to keep him out of politics.

He has recently stepped up his political activity after announcing plans last year to run for the presidency in 2018. President Putin is allowed by the constitution to run for a second consecutive six-year term, but he has not said yet if he plans to run.

Alexei Navalny’s rise as a force in Russian politics began in 2008 when he started blogging about alleged malpractice and corruption at some of Russia’s big state-controlled corporations.

He described Vladimir Putin’s United Russia as “the party of crooks and thieves”, a phrase that stuck among many in Russia.

Alexei Navalny stood for Moscow mayor in 2013 and got more than a quarter of the vote, a surprise for many.

In the first trial, in 2013, Alexei Navalny was found guilty of heading a group that embezzled timber worth 16 million roubles ($500,000) from the Kirovles state timber company while working as an adviser to Kirov’s governor, Nikita Belykh.

Alexei Navalny had described the rerun of the trial as an “exact copy” of the original proceedings, and said he was sure he would be found guilty once again.


President Donald Trump held a series of phone calls with world leaders, including one with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

According to the Kremlin, both sides had agreed to make fighting “international terrorism” – including ISIS and “other terrorist groups” in Syria – a top priority.

And the White House said the call was a “significant start” to improving a relationship “in need of repair”.

President Trump also spoke with leaders from Japan, Germany, France and Australia.

In a statement in English, the Kremlin provided more details of the first official call between the two leaders since Donald Trump took office.

The Kremlin said it was a “positive and constructive” conversation, during which they discussed the fight against terrorism, the Middle East and the Arab-Israeli conflict, strategic stability, non-proliferation and Iran’s nuclear program, North and South Korea, the situation in Ukraine.

The Russian account of the call was also notable for its lack of any mention of economic sanctions against Russia by the US, which have been the subject of much speculation in recent days.

However, the statement did say both parties “stressed the importance of rebuilding mutually beneficial trade”, which, the Kremlin said, could aid the development of relations in other areas.

Russia considers all anti-Assad rebels in Syria as terrorist fighters, though the previous US administration has supported some moderate rebel groups opposed to President Bashar al-Assad.

The White House did not offer additional clarity on the items discussed, but rather issued a short statement saying: “Both President Trump and President Putin are hopeful that after today’s call the two sides can move quickly to tackle terrorism and other important issues of mutual concern.”

Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin also agreed to arrange a face-to-face meeting for a later date – and stay in “regular personal contact”.

In his other phone calls on January 28, President Trump invited Japanese PM Shinzo Abe to the White House in a meeting scheduled for February 10, press secretary Sean Spicer said.

Rex Tillerson has been narrowly approved as secretary of state, despite concerns about his business ties to Russia.

The Senate Foreign Relations Committee split along party lines, with all 11 Republicans voting in favor and all 10 Democrats against. A full vote will now be held in the Republican-run Senate.

The move capped a busy day for Donald Trump’s administration.

Most notable was the US withdrawal from the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), fulfilling a campaign pledge.

President Donald Trump signed an executive order to pull out from the 12-nation trade deal that had been a linchpin of former President Barack Obama’s Asia policy.

He said: “Great thing for the American worker what we just did.”

Also on January 23, the Senate confirmed Mike Pompeo as Donald Trump’s CIA director.

Mike Pompeo’s immediate task, correspondents say, will be to establish an effective relationship between the spy agency and Donald Trump.

Image source Flickr

Donald Trump has been critical of the CIA for concluding that Russia had been actively working to influence the US presidential election in his favor.

In another development, new US Defense Secretary James Mattis said Washington had an “unshakeable commitment” to NATO, despite Donald Trump’s earlier description of the military alliance as “obsolete”.

The Senate Foreign Relations Committee approved Rex Tillerson after leading Republican Senator Marco Rubio dropped his opposition.

Marco Rubio sparred with Rex Tillerson during confirmation hearings earlier this month, accusing him of being soft on Russia.

The 64-year-old former head of Exxon Mobil knows Russian President Vladimir Putin through his business dealings.

However, Rex Tillerson has criticized Moscow for its annexation of Ukraine’s southern Crimea peninsula in 2014.

Marco Rubio said that although he had doubts over the choice, he believed a new president was entitled to deference in assembling his cabinet.

“Despite my reservations, I will support Mr. Tillerson’s nomination in committee and in the full Senate,” said Marco Rubio.

He had challenged Rex Tillerson over his refusal to call President Vladimir Putin a “war criminal” over Russia’s air strikes in Syria and his failure to condemn strongly enough human rights violations in Saudi Arabia and the Philippines.

Marco Rubio was among the candidates who fought Donald Trump in the battle for the Republican presidential ticket.

The partisan split in the voting is unusual. Traditionally, nominees for secretary of state have been approved by overwhelming votes from both parties.

Senator Ben Cardin, the committee’s top Democrat, had said he would not vote for Rex Tillerson, also over his position on Russia as well as other issues.

He also suggested that Rex Tillerson’s “business orientation” could “compromise his ability as secretary of state to forcefully promote the values and ideals that have defined” America.

While critics raise concern about Rex Tillerson’s ability to trade in his corporate interest for a national one, some supporters suggest the former CEO’s background as a global dealmaker may bring fresh perspective to the nation’s top diplomatic post.

At a closed doors meeting on January 23, Donald Trump told congressional leaders he would have won the popular vote in the election if millions of undocumented immigrants had not voted illegally. He gave no evidence for the claim.

Hillary Clinton won nearly three million votes more than Donald Trump, who got more support in key swing states and won the Electoral College.

However, any notion of widespread voter fraud was widely rejected as untrue when Donald Trump made the same claim in November.


Vladimir Putin has described allegations Russia holds compromising material on President-elect Donald Trump as “utter nonsense”.

The Russian president questioned what reason Russian intelligence would have had to spy on Donald Trump before he entered politics.

Vladimir Putin said those making the allegations were “worse than prostitutes”.

Memos published last week alleged Donald Trump’s election team colluded with Russia which also had salacious videos of his private life.

The allegations claim Russia has damaging information about Donald Trump’s business interests, and that Trump had been filmed with prostitutes at the Ritz-Carlton hotel in Moscow during the Miss Universe pageant in 2013.

Donald Trump has dismissed the memos, said to have been prepared by a former British spy, as “fake news”.

Image NBC News

Speaking in Moscow, Vladimir Putin also said the published documents were “clearly fakes”, published by those trying to “undermine the legitimacy of the elected president”.

“When Trump came to Moscow, he was not a political figure, we were not even aware of his political ambitions,” he said.

“Does somebody think that our secret services are chasing every American billionaire? Of course not. It is utter nonsense.”

Vladimir Putin added that he did not see why Donald Trump would rush to meet prostitutes in Moscow, given he was organizing beauty pageants and meeting “the most beautiful women in the world”.

“I find it hard to imagine he ran to a hotel to meet our girls of <<low social responsibility>>… though they are of course also the best in the world. But I doubt Trump took that bait.”

Earlier, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said the UK ex-spy said to have prepared the memos is “some runaway crook from the MI6”.

US intelligence agencies considered the claims relevant enough to brief both Donald Trump and President Barack Obama.

Donald Trump accused US intelligence of leaking the content from a classified briefing – a claim denied by National Intelligence Director James Clapper.

Vladimir Putin also said reports that Russian hackers had interfered in the US election were “fake news”, though he told people to keep in mind that “the hackers didn’t make anything up – whoever they were – they just uncovered material”.

The hacking scandal dominated the US election campaign, with US spy agencies concluding Russia was behind the hacking and release of Democratic Party emails intended to damage the campaign of Hillary Clinton.

Russia has consistently denied it.

Signaling optimism that the US-Russia relationship will improve under the new administration, Sergei Lavrov said he was encouraged by some pragmatic comments from the Trump team so far.

Sergei Lavrov said that Moscow was ready to co-operate with the new administration on key issues including nuclear weapons and Syria. US representatives have been invited to Syria peace talks in Kazakhstan next week but are yet to respond, he added.

“I am convinced we will be able to restart a dialogue on strategic stability with Washington that was destroyed along with everything else by the Obama administration,” Sergei Lavrov was quoted as saying by Reuters.

US-Russia relations have worsened significantly in recent years over the war in Ukraine, the Syrian conflict and cyber-hacking.

In his first press conference as president-elect, Donald Trump says allegations Russia has compromising material on him are “fake news, phoney stuff”, put together by “sick people”.

Donald Trump was replying to unsubstantiated allegations that his election team colluded with Russia and there were salacious videos of his private life.

Intelligence agencies considered the claims relevant enough to brief both President-elect Donald Trump and President Barack Obama last week.

Donald Trump also said for the first time that Russia was behind hacking attacks.

He went on to confirm he was handing total control of his businesses to his two sons.

His first briefing was scheduled in order for Donald Trump to give details about his business affairs, but was dominated by the allegations of compromising material.

Donald Trump said the information “should never have entered paper… it should never have been released”.

Image source Flickr

“It’s all fake news, it’s phoney stuff, it didn’t happen,” he said, adding that “sick people” had “put that crap together… it’s an absolute disgrace”.

Donald Trump thanked the news organizations that chose not to run with the claims, which have been circulating for months.

He said he could not talk about what he heard in last week’s intelligence agency briefing, but said there had been “many witnesses” there and that it would be a “tremendous blot” on the reputation of intelligence agencies if they had been responsible for leaking the details.

“That’s something that Nazi Germany would have done,” he said.

In response White House spokesman Josh Earnest said it was “deeply misguided for anybody, at any level, to question the integrity and motives of the patriots” in the nation’s intelligence agencies.

A 35-page dossier of allegations has been published in full on Buzzfeed and reported by CNN.

Donald Trump called Buzzfeed a “failing pile of garbage” and accused CNN of “going out of their way to build it up”.

The allegations claim Russia has damaging information about Donald Trump’s business interests, and salacious video evidence of his private life, including claims of using prostitutes at the Ritz-Carlton hotel in Moscow.

Denying any such claims, Donald Trump said that as a high-profile person he was extremely cautious about all that he did when travelling abroad.

Russia has also strongly denied the allegations.

President Vladimir Putin’s spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, said they were “pulp fiction” and a “clear attempt to damage relations”.

Donald Trump said he “respected” Vladimir Putin for putting out a statement.

He was also asked about the hacking scandal that dominated the US election campaign, with the intelligences concluding Russia was behind the hacking of Democratic Party emails.

Donald Trump said for the first time “I think it was Russia”, but added that “we get hacked by other people”.

The president-elect said: “We talk about the hacking and hacking’s bad and it shouldn’t be done.”

But he added: “Look at the things that were hacked, look at what was learned from that hacking… Hillary Clinton got the questions to the debate and didn’t report it.”

Donald Trump added: “If Putin likes Donald Trump, I consider that an asset, not a liability.”

He did not answer directly when asked whether his team had communicated with Russia during the election campaign, but he did say that any hacking by Vladimir Putin must stop.

“He shouldn’t be doing it. He won’t be doing it.”

Before today’s briefing, the Trump team acted to dismiss news of the compromising material.

Michael Cohen, a lawyer to Donald Trump named in the 35-page dossier, denied a specific claim that he went to Prague in August or September 2016 to meet Kremlin representatives to talk about the hacking.

He tweeted: “I’ve never been to Prague in my life. #fakenews.”

Reince Priebus, Donald Trump’s chief of staff, called the dossier report “phoney baloney garbage”.

US media suggest the alleged salacious videos were prepared as “kompromat” – material collected about a politician or public figure in order to create a threat of negative publicity, if needed.

The allegations began circulating in political and media circles in recent months. The existence of the documents was first reported by Mother Jones in October 2016.

During his Senate confirmation hearing, Donald Trump’s pick as secretary of state, Rex Tillerson, said it is a “fair assumption” that Russian President Vladimir Putin was behind US election hacks.

The former CEO of Exxon Mobil told the hearing committee the intelligence report on Russian tampering “clearly is troubling”.

Rex Tillerson’s comments came after Senator Marco Rubio pressed him to admit Vladimir Putin’s role in the cyber-breach.

His reported good ties with Vladimir Putin have alarmed some in the United States.

Rex Tillerson, 64, faced tough questions from the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on January 11.

In a heated exchange, Marco Rubio grilled him on whether intelligence reports about Russia’s involvement in hacks on the US election were accurate and if Vladimir Putin had directed the attacks.

Rex Tillerson said he had no inside information on the detailed intelligence about Russia’s hacking, but he had read the declassified US report released last week on the issue.

The Florida senator suggested that Vladimir Putin was responsible for war crimes because of Moscow’s support for Syrian President Bashar Assad and bombing of Aleppo.

However, the Texan multimillionaire told Marco Rubio he would not describe Vladimir Putin as a war criminal.

Image source Flickr

Rex Tillerson said: “I would not use that term.”

“Those are very, very serious charges to make and I’d want to have much more information before reaching that conclusion,” he added.

Marco Rubio – who was one of Donald Trump’s rivals for the Republican nomination – said he had “serious concerns” about Rex Tillerson as America’s top diplomat.

While Rex Tillerson was grilled by senators in Washington DC, up in New York Donald Trump was rejecting claims that Russian intelligence agencies have compromising information about the president-elect.

In his first news conference in nearly six months on January 11, at Trump Tower, Donald Trump dismissed the allegations against him as “fake news” and “phony stuff” crafted by “sick people”.

Russia has called the allegations “pulp fiction” and a “clear attempt to damage relations”.

In his Senate statement, Rex Tillerson warned that Americans should be “clear-eyed about our relationship with Russia”.

“Russia today poses a danger, but it is not unpredictable in advancing its own interests. It has invaded Ukraine, including the taking of Crimea, and supported Syrian forces that brutally violate the laws of war,” he said.

“Our NATO allies are right to be alarmed at a resurgent Russia,” he added.

It is Rex Tillerson’s connections to Russia that have drawn the most flak in recent months.

Rex Tillerson has forged multi-billion-dollar deals with Russia’s state oil company, Rosneft, spoken out against international sanctions imposed on Moscow and in 2013 was awarded an Order of Friendship by the Kremlin.

The Kremlin has strongly denied claims Russia’s intelligence agencies have compromising material about Donald Trump.

President Vladimir Putin’s spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, said the allegations were “pulp fiction” and a “clear attempt to damage relations”.

The unsubstantiated claims say Donald Trump’s presidential campaign secretly communicated with Moscow. They also say Russia has information about Donald Trump involving prostitutes.

The president-elect has condemned the reports.

He responded on Twitter: “FAKE NEWS – A TOTAL POLITICAL WITCH HUNT!”

Later on January 11, Donald Trump went on to write: “Russia has never tried to use leverage over me. I HAVE NOTHING TO DO WITH RUSSIA – NO DEALS, NO LOANS, NO NOTHING!”

Image NBC News

Donald Trump is due to hold a news conference on January 11, nine days before he takes office.

It was meant to be about his attempts to separate himself from his business commitments, to address concerns about conflicts of interest.

However, it now comes at an awkward time for Donald Trump.

Last week, US intelligence agencies released an unclassified report saying Russia ran a hacking campaign to influence the US presidential elections.

Separate reports circulating in media now say Russia has damaging information about Donald Trump’s business interests and salacious video evidence of his private life.

Among the claims included in a 35-page dossier are that Donald Trump’s aides were involved with the alleged Russian hack of the Democratic Party of his rival Hillary Clinton.

Michael Cohen, a lawyer to Donald Trump named in the memos, has denied a specific claim that he went to Prague in August or September 2016 to meet Kremlin representatives to talk about the hacking.

“I’ve never been to Prague in my life. #fakenews,” he tweeted.

Media suggest the videos were prepared as “kompromat” – compromising material collected about a politician or public figure in order to create a threat of negative publicity, if needed.


Five prominent Russians have been blacklisted by the Obama administration, just 11 days before the president leaves office.

Chief federal investigator Alexander Bastrykin and two men wanted in the UK for the murder of Russian dissident Alexander Litvinenko are among them.

The US sanctions come amid worsening ties, including claims Russia ran a cyber campaign to influence the November 8 election.

President-elect Donald Trump is seeking to restore closer relations with Russia.

According to officials, the sanctions are not related to the hacking but come under a 2012 law designed to punish human rights violators.

Under the act named after Russian tax fraud whistleblower Sergey Magnitsky, who died in a Moscow prison in 2009, people on the list have their US assets blocked and are banned from travelling to the United States.

It originally targeted officials implicated in Sergey Magnitsky’s death, but has since been broadened to cover other human rights cases.

Image source Moscow Times

The five persons to be blacklisted are: Alexander Bastrykin, a close aide to President Vladimir Putin and head of the federal investigative agency, who has led campaigns against domestic dissidents and foreign NGOs working in Russia. US officials say he was complicit in the Magnitsky case; Gennady Plaksin, former head of the Universal Savings Bank, and Stanislav Gordiyevsky, former investigative agency official. Both are said to be involved in covering up Magnitsky’s death; Andrei Lugovoi and Dmitry Kovtun, the main suspects in the poisoning of former KGB agent and London exile Alexander Litvinenko in 2006.

Alexander Litvinenko died after drinking tea laced with a rare radioactive substance at a hotel in London.

Both Andrei Lugovoi and Dmitry Kovtun deny any involvement in the killing, and efforts to extradite the men to the UK have failed.

Last month, Washington expelled 35 Russian diplomats following allegations by US intelligence services that Russia had ordered the hacking of Democratic Party emails to damage Donald Trump’s Democrat rival for the presidency, Hillary Clinton.

Russia denies the allegations and on January 9 described them as a witch-hunt, but has so far not responded to the expulsions.

After the 35 were thrown out, Russia declined to respond in kind, with President Vladimir Putin saying his country would not stoop to “irresponsible diplomacy”.

Donald Trump, meanwhile, is said to have accepted the findings of the report but has declined to single out Russia as the source of the hacking.

President-elect Donald Trump says Democrats have shown “gross negligence” by allowing their servers to be hacked in the run-up to the November 8 presidential election.

Donald Trump made the comments after an intelligence report said Russian President Vladimir Putin had “sought to help Donald Trump win”.

He has stopped short of accusing Russia of interfering, saying only that the election outcome was not affected.

The Kremlin has not commented, but Russia has previously denied the claims.

Following the report’s findings, the US Department of Homeland Security announced that voting machines and other election databases would be classified as “critical infrastructure” and given more protection from cyber-attacks.

Emphasizing that the election outcome was not affected, Donald Trump added on January 7: “Only reason the hacking of the poorly defended DNC is discussed is that the loss by the Dems was so big that they are totally embarrassed!”

Image source Flickr

In an interview with ABC, President Barack Obama said that he was concerned that there had been “Republicans or pundits or cable commentators who seem to have more confidence in Vladimir Putin than fellow Americans because those fellow Americans are Democrats.

“That cannot be.”

Asked whether Donald Trump was among them, President Obama said: “We have to remind ourselves we’re on the same team. Vladimir Putin’s not on our team.”

The unclassified report says that Russia developed a “clear preference” for Donald Trump.

Russia’s goals, the document added, were to “undermine public faith” in the US democratic process and “denigrate” Hillary Clinton, harming her electability and potential presidency.

However, the report gives no detailed evidence of Vladimir Putin’s alleged role.

The report says the Russian president liked Donald Trump because he had vowed to work with Russia and the Russian leader had had “many positive experiences working with Western political leaders whose business interests made them more disposed to deal with Russia, such as former Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi and former German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder”.

In contrast, Vladimir Putin had blamed Hillary Clinton for inciting anti-government protests in 2011 and early 2012 “and because he holds a grudge for comments he almost certainly saw as disparaging him”.

According to an intelligence report, Russian President Vladimir Putin sought to help Donald Trump win the presidential election.

The unclassified report says Vladimir Putin “ordered” a campaign aimed at influencing the election.

Moscow has not commented, but Russia has previously denied the claims.

After being briefed on the findings, Donald Trump stopped short of accusing Russia of interfering, saying only that the election outcome was not affected.

The president-elect later went on to blame “gross negligence” by the DNC for “allowing” the hacking to take place.

Following the report’s findings, the US Department of Homeland Security announced that voting machines and other election databases would be classified as “critical infrastructure” and given more protection from cyber-attack.

The 25-page report says that Russia developed a “clear preference” for Donald Trump.

Russia’s goals, the document added, were to “undermine public faith” in the US democratic process and “denigrate” Hillary Clinton, harming her electability and potential presidency.

Image NBC News

The report said: “We assess Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered an influence campaign in 2016 aimed at the US presidential election.”

The unclassified version contained no detailed evidence of Vladimir Putin’s alleged role, but it said Russia’s actions included: hacking into the email accounts of the DNC and top Democrats; using intermediaries such as WikiLeaks, DCLeaks.com and Guccifer 2.0 persona to release the information acquired from the hackings; using state-funded propaganda and paying social media users or “trolls” to make nasty comments.

The identities of the Russian agents allegedly directly responsible for the hack are known to US authorities but have not been released publicly, reports say, citing intelligence sources.

The report, a cut-down version of the classified document presented to President Barack Obama on January 5, was released shortly after intelligence chiefs briefed Donald Trump on their findings.

Since winning the election on November 8, Donald Trump has repeatedly questioned US intelligence claims of Russian hacking.

In a statement after the briefing, Donald Trump declined to single out Russia, but said he had “tremendous respect for the work and service done” by those in the US intelligence community.

He said: “While Russia, China, other countries, outside groups and people are consistently trying to break through the cyber infrastructure of our governmental institutions, businesses and organizations including the Democrat National Committee, there was absolutely no effect on the outcome of the election.

“Whether it is our government, organizations, associations or businesses we need to aggressively combat and stop cyber-attacks. I will appoint a team to give me a plan within 90 days of taking office.”

The meeting at Trump Tower involved National Intelligence Director Gen. James Clapper, CIA Director John Brennan and FBI Director James Comey.

Donald Trump, who will be inaugurated on January 20, described their talks as “constructive”.