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north korea nuclear program

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The latest UN sanctions imposed on North Korea have been described by Pyongyang as an “act of war”.

A North Korea’s foreign ministry statement said the measures were tantamount to a total economic blockade, the official KCNA news agency reported.

The statement added that strengthening North Korea’s deterrence was the only way to frustrate the US.

On December 22, the UN Security Council imposed the new sanctions on North Korea in response to Pyongyang’s ballistic missile tests.


The US-drafted resolution – unanimously backed by all 15 Security Council members – includes measures to cut North Korea’s petrol imports by up to 90%.

North Korea is already subject to a raft of sanctions from the US, the UN and the EU.

Image source Wikimedia

UN Imposes New Sanctions on North Korea over Ballistic Missile Tests

Alleged North Korean Economic Agent Arrested in Australia

Characteristically bellicose, North Korea described the latest UN sanctions “as a violent breach of our republic’s sovereignty and an act of war that destroys the peace and stability of the Korean peninsula and a wide region: “The United States, completely terrified at our accomplishment of the great historic cause of completing the state nuclear force, is getting more and more frenzied in the moves to impose the harshest-ever sanctions and pressure on our country.

“We will further consolidate our self-defensive nuclear deterrence aimed at fundamentally eradicating the US nuclear threats, blackmail and hostile moves by establishing the practical balance of force with the US.”

The US said it was seeking a diplomatic solution to the issue and drafted this new set of sanctions, including deliveries of petrol products will be capped at 500,000 barrels a year, and crude oil at four million barrels a year; all North Korean nationals working abroad will have to return home within 24 months under the proposals, restricting a vital source of foreign currency.

There will also be a ban on exports of North Korean goods, such as machinery and electrical equipment.

The UN sanctions came in response to North Korea’s November 28 firing of a ballistic missile, which the US said was its highest yet.

President Donald Trump has previously threatened to “totally destroy” North Korea if it launches a nuclear attack while North Korean leader Kim Jong-un has described the American president as “mentally deranged”.

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Australian authorities have arrested a man for allegedly acting as an economic agent for North Korea.

Australian Federal Police (AFP) said that Chan Han Choi, 59, has been charged with brokering illegal exports from the country and discussing the supply of weapons of mass destruction.

Police allege Chan Han Choi has broken both UN and Australian sanctions.

The case against Chan Han Choi, who has lived in Australia for more than 30 years, is the first of its kind in the country.

It is the first time anyone has been charged under Australia’s 1995 Weapons of Mass Destruction (Prevention of Proliferation) Act.

Police say there was evidence that Chan Han Choi had been in contact with “high ranking officials in North Korea”.

They allege he had brokered services related to North Korea’s weapons program, including the sale of specialist services including ballistic missile technology to foreign entities, in order to generate income for the North Korean regime.

Image source Public Domain Pictures

Charles Jenkins: US Army Sergeant Who Defected to North Korea Dies in Japan Aged 77

US Urges World to Cut Diplomatic and Trade Ties with North Korea

Chan Han Choi also was charged with brokering the sale of coal from North Korea to groups in Indonesia and Vietnam. He is facing six charges in total after being arrested at his Sydney home on December 16.

In a news conference, police confirmed the man was a naturalized Australian citizen of Korean origin who had been in the country for over 30 years.

They described him as a “loyal agent” who “believed he was acting to serve some higher patriotic purpose”.

However, police insisted Chan Han Choi’s actions did not pose any “direct risk” to Australians, with the actions occurring offshore.

“I know these charges sound alarming. Let me be clear we are not suggesting there are any weapons or missile component that ever came to Australian soil,” AFP Assistant Commissioner Neil Gaughan said.

“Any individual who attempts to fly in the face of sanctions cannot and will not go unnoticed in Australia.”

Chan Han Choi could face up to 10 years in prison and has been denied bail.

In October the Australian government said they had received a letter from North Korea urging Canberra to distance itself from the Trump administration.

North Korea had previously warned that Australia would “not be able to avoid a disaster” if it followed US policies towards Kim Jong-un’s regime.

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The crew of a Cathay Pacific flight from San Franscisco to Hong Kong flying over Japan reported a suspected sighting of last week’s North Korean missile test.

On November 29, North Korea launched a new intercontinental ballistic missile it said could reach anywhere in the US.

The test-launch raised tension further with South Korea and the US, who on December 4 began their largest ever joint air exercise, which North Korea has branded an “all-out provocation”.

Described by North Korea as its “most powerful” missile, the November 29 launch ended up in Japanese waters but flew higher than any other the North had previously tested.

According to the South China Morning Post, Cathay Pacific’s general manager of operations Mark Hoey told staff in a message that “today the crew of CX893 reported, <<Be advised, we witnessed the DPRK missile blow up and fall apart near our current location>>”.

The launch was reportedly also witnessed by two South Korean aircraft en route to Seoul from the US.

Image source Wikimedia

North Korea Fires New Ballistic Missile

Hawaii Activates Nuclear Attack Warning Siren for First Time since Cold War

Unlike other countries, North Korea usually does not announce its missile tests which means they come without warning or known flight path, posing a potential risk to planes.

North Korea does have access to international civil aviation data so it can study the airspace before any launch.

While the risk of an incident remains very low, it is something that airlines are taking into consideration. In early August, Air France expanded their no-fly zone around North Korea after it transpired one of its planes flew close to a North Korean missile path.

The December 4 air exercise between the US and South Korea, called Vigilant Ace, will last for five days.

It will involve some 230 aircraft, including two dozen stealth jets, and tens of thousands of military personnel.

North Korea has condemned the drills, saying over the weekend that the US was “begging for nuclear war” and that it would “seriously consider” counter-measures to the exercises.

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Hawaii has tested a nuclear attack warning siren for the first time since the end of the Cold War.

The resumption of the monthly tests comes amid a growing threat from North Korea’s missile and nuclear program.

North Korea has tested a series of ballistic missiles and in September carried out its sixth nuclear test.

Hawaii already has a monthly test of sirens warning of natural disasters, including tsunamis.

The nuclear attack signal uses a different, wavering tone, warning residents and tourists to stay indoors and await further instructions.

The last time a nuclear attack warning siren was tested in the state was in the 1980s in the final years of the Cold War.

Image source Flickr

North Korea Fires New Ballistic Missile

However, it sounded again on December 1 and will be repeated on the first business day of every month.

Vern Miyagi, the head of the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency, said it was “critically important” for the public to understand what the different tones mean, the Honolulu Star-Advertiser reported.

A missile launched from North Korea could strike Hawaii within 20 minutes of launch, the publication added.

Hawaii hosts the US military headquarters for the Asia-Pacific region.

Pyongyang recently tested a new intercontinental ballistic missile which it claims can hit anywhere on the mainland United States.

Experts say the Hwasong-15 appears capable of transporting a nuclear warhead, although it is unclear if North Korea is yet capable of making a weapon small enough to be fitted on to a missile.

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The US has urged the world to cut diplomatic and trade ties with North Korea following its latest ballistic missile test.

Speaking at the UN Security Council, US envoy Nikki Haley said President Donald Trump had asked his Chinese counterpart to cut off oil supplies to Pyongyang.

Nikki Haley said the US did not seek conflict but that North Korea’s regime would be “utterly destroyed” if war broke out.

The warning came after North Korea tested its first missile in two months.

North Korea said the missile fired on November 29, which it said reached an altitude of about 2,780 miles – more than 10 times the height of the International Space Station – carried a warhead capable of re-entering the Earth’s atmosphere.

The claim was not proven and experts have cast doubt on North Korea’s ability to master such technology.

Image source Wikimedia

North Korea Fires New Ballistic Missile

US Declares North Korea A State Sponsor of Terrorism

However, North Korean leader Kim Jong-un called the launch “impeccable” and a “breakthrough”.

The test – one of several this year – has been condemned by the international community and the UN Security Council called an emergency meeting.

Nikki Haley warned that “continued acts of aggression” were only serving to further destabilize the region.

Russia’s Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said sanctions were exhausted.

He told reporters: “The Americans should explain to all of us what they are trying to do – if they want to find a pretext for destroying North Korea they should come clean about it, and the American leadership should confirm it.”

Earlier the Russian UN ambassador said North Korea should stop its missile and nuclear tests but also called on Washington to cancel military exercises with South Korea planned for December as it would “inflame an already explosive situation”.

China also suggested North Korea should stop the tests in return for a halt to US military exercises – a proposal Washington has rejected in the past.

Nikki Haley said on November 29: “We need China to do more.

“President Trump called President Xi this morning and told him that we’ve come to the point where China must cut off the oil for North Korea.

“We know the main driver of its nuclear production is oil,” she said. “The major supplier of that oil is China.”

China is a historic ally and North Korea’s most important trading partner and Pyongyang is thought to be dependent on China for much of its oil supplies.

Also in the day, the White House said that President Trump spoke to his counterpart, Xi Jinping, by phone, urging him to “use all available levers to convince North Korea to end its provocations and return to the path of denuclearization”.

Donald Trump tweeted: “Just spoke to President XI JINPING of China concerning the provocative actions of North Korea. Additional major sanctions will be imposed on North Korea today. This situation will be handled!”

Speaking in Missouri, President Trump derided Kim Jong-un, describing him as a “sick puppy” and “little rocket man”.

Xi Jinping responded by telling Donald Trump it was Beijing’s “unswerving goal to maintain peace and stability in north-east Asia and denuclearize the Korean peninsula”, Chinese news agency Xinhua reported.

Experts say the height reached by the inter-continental ballistic missile (ICBM) indicates the US could be within range, although North Korea is yet to prove it has reached its aim of miniaturizing a nuclear warhead.

North Korea has launched a new ballistic missile, the latest in a series of launches that have raised tensions with its neighbors and the US.

According to the Pentagon, it was an intercontinental ballistic missile that flew for about 620 miles and fell into the Sea of Japan.

South Korean news agency Yonhap said that the missile was launched from Pyongsong, South Pyongan province.

Pyongyang’s last ballistic missile test was in September.

That came days after North Korea had conducted its sixth – and largest – nuclear test.

The US said the latest launch happened at about 03:30 local time.

Japan’s government said the missile travelled for about 50 minutes but did not fly over Japan, as some have done in the past.

US Declares North Korea A State Sponsor of Terrorism

President Donald Trump Urges North Korea to Discuss Giving Up Nuclear Weapons

President Donald Trump Urges North Korea to Discuss Giving Up Nuclear Weapons

President Donald Trump was briefed while the missile was still in the air, the White House has said. Afterwards the president said: “We will take care of it.”

South Korea’s military said it had responded to the launch with a missile exercise of its own.

North Korea is thought to be focusing efforts on building long-range missiles with the potential of reaching the mainland continental US.

North Korean officials said the first of the longer-range missiles it tested in July could hit “any part of the world”, but the US military called it an intermediate-range missile instead.

Its last nuclear test reportedly involved a miniaturized hydrogen bomb that could be loaded on to a long-range missile, raising tensions with the US even further.

Last week, President Donald Trump announced that the US was re-designating North Korea a state sponsor of terrorism because of its missile and nuclear program.

The US later imposed fresh sanctions against North Korea. The measures targeted North Korean shipping operations and Chinese companies that traded with Pyongyang.

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President Donald Trump has announced that the US is re-designating North Korea a state sponsor of terrorism, nine years after it was removed from the list.

In a cabinet meeting, President Trump said the move would trigger “very large” additional sanctions to be announced on November 21.

However, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson later admitted that “the practical effects may be limited”.

President Trump blamed North Korea’s nuclear program, and support for what he called international acts of terrorism.

While announcing the decision at the White House, President Trump said it “should have happened a long time ago”.

In September, the US proposed a range of UN sanctions against North Korea, including an oil ban and a freeze on leader Kim Jong-un’s assets.

It followed North Korea’s sixth nuclear test and repeated missile launches.

North Korea joins Iran, Sudan and Syria on a list of countries that are deemed to have repeatedly provided support for acts of international terrorism.

Photo AP

President Donald Trump Urges North Korea to Discuss Giving Up Nuclear Weapons

North Korea Crisis: US Flies Bombers over Korean Peninsula

US Denies War Declaration Against North Korea

It has been on the list before but was removed in 2008 by the administration of George W. Bush as part of negotiations on its nuclear program.

The campaign to reinstate it intensified after the American student Otto Warmbier died shortly after he was released from North Korean custody.

Speaking to reporters at a White House press briefing, Rex Tillerson said the designation was meant to hold North Korea accountable for recent actions it has taken “including assassinations outside of their country” and “using banned chemical weapons”.

The secretary of state admitted that given existing sanctions it was “very symbolic” but also said new measures could “disrupt and dissuade some third parties from undertaking certain activities with North Korea”.

“The practical effects may be limited but hopefully we’re closing off a few loopholes with this,” he said.

Kim Jong-un continues to pursue nuclear weapons and missile programs in defiance of UN Security Council sanctions.

The North Korean leader has made no secret of Pyongyang’s plans to develop a missile capable of reaching the US mainland and has claimed to have developed a hydrogen bomb.

Last month, Defense Secretary James Mattis said that the threat of nuclear attack from North Korea was increasing.

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During his visit to South Korea, President Donald Trump has urged North Korea to “come to the table” and discuss giving up its nuclear weapons.

Striking a different tone from previous fiery rhetoric, the president said he “hoped to God” he did not have to use the US military against North Korea.

Donald Trump was speaking at a press conference with South Korea’s President Moon Jae-in in Seoul, as part of his tour of Asia.

The president has previously threatened “fire and fury” against North Korea.

Donald Trump is on a five-nation tour of Asia, where Pyongyang’s nuclear ambitions have been high on his agenda.

At a press conference, Presidents Trump and Moon reiterated their call for Pyongyang to denuclearize, with Donald Trump saying it “makes sense for North Korea to come to the table”, and to “do the right thing, not only for North Korea but for humanity all over the world”.

The two leaders also called on China and Russia to put pressure on North Korea, and said they were lifting the limit on South Korean missile payloads, which they had agreed to do in September.

Image source NBC News

Donald Trump: “US Military Is Locked and Loaded to Deal with North Korea”

Donald Trump Warns North Korea of “Pretty Severe” Response Following ICBM Test

Donald Trump Criticizes China Following North Korea’s Test of Long-Range Missile

President Trump also said that South Korea would be ordering “billions of dollars” in military equipment from the US, which he said would reduce their trade deficit.

It was unclear if a deal was already struck, but Moon Jae-in said they had agreed to “begin consultations on acquisitions” that would enhance South Korea’s defense capabilities.

President Trump had earlier tweeted that “massive military and energy order” from Japan were also happening, and claimed on November 6 that Japan could shoot down North Korea’s missiles with US equipment.

Japan’s PM Shinzo Abe said earlier that he was considering it.

Though the President Trump will only spend about 24 hours in South Korea, it is perhaps the most symbolic stop in his Asian tour.

His visit is designed to bolster the military alliance that has long protected South Korea, and strength in unity is the message they want to send to North Korean leader Kim Jong-un just across the border.

However, the two presidents also have their differences. President Trump has previously accused Moon Jae-in’s government of trying to appease North Korea.

Donald Trump has also previously criticized the free trade agreement between the US and South Korea, and has made clear he wants to re-negotiate its terms.

During the press conference, President Trump said the deal had been “quite unsuccessful” for the US, and that the two countries were going to “pursue a much better deal”.

Protests against Donald Trump, as well as counter-rallies welcoming him, have been held in Seoul and elsewhere.

President Trump will be going to China, Vietnam and the Philippines in the coming week.

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The US and South Korea have conducted a joint military exercise, flying two strategic bombers over the Korean peninsula.

The B-1B combat bombers were joined by two South Korean F-15K fighter jets, and carried out air-to-ground missile drills off South Korean waters.

The move comes amid heightened tensions with North Korea over its nuclear program.

North Korea conducted its sixth nuclear test, and launched two missiles over Japan, in recent months.

The bombers took off from the US Pacific territory of Guam on October 10, before entering South Korean airspace and conducting firing exercises over the East Sea and Yellow Sea, South Korea’s military said.

The training was part of a program of “extended deterrence” against North Korea, it added.

Image source Andersen Air Force Base

North Korean Hackers Reportedly Stole US, South Korea War Plans and Other Military Secrets

US Extends Travel Ban to North Korea, Venezuela and Chad

North Korea Warns that More Sanctions Will Accelerate Its Nuclear Program

The US said Japan’s air force also took part in the drill.

According to the White House, President Donald Trump met top officials from his national security team on Tuesday night for a briefing on ways to respond to threats from North Korea.

President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un have exchanged heated rhetoric in recent weeks.

In aspeech at the UN last month, President Trump accused Kim Jong-un of being “on a suicide mission” – while the North Korean leader responded by vowing to “tame the mentally deranged US dotard with fire”.

On October 11, a South Korean lawmaker said North Korean hackers had reportedly stolen a large cache of military documents from his country, including a plan to assassinate Kim Jong-un, and wartime contingency plans drawn up by the US and South Korea.

The South Korean defense ministry refused to comment about the allegation, while North Korea denied the claim.

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According to new reports, North Korean hackers have stolen a large cache of military documents from South Korea, including a plan to assassinate the country’s leader Kim Jong-un.

South Korean lawmaker Rhee Cheol-hee said the information was from his country’s defense ministry.

The compromised documents include wartime contingency plans drawn up by the United States and South Korea.

The documents also include reports to the allies’ senior commanders.

The South Korean defense ministry has so far refused to comment about the allegation.

Plans for South Korea’s special forces were reportedly accessed, along with information on significant power plants and military facilities in the South.

Rhee Cheol-hee belongs to South Korea’s ruling party, and sits on its parliament’s defense committee. He said some 235 Gb of military documents had been stolen from the Defense Integrated Data Centre, and that 80% of them have yet to be identified.

The hack took place in September 2016. In May 2017, South Korea said a large amount of data had been stolen and that North Korea may have instigated the cyber attack – but gave no details of what was taken.

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Pentagon: US Bombers Fly Close to North Korea’s East Coast In Show of Force

North Korea Claims It Has Developed Hydrogen Bomb

According to South Korea’s Yonhap news agency, Seoul has been subject to a barrage of cyber attacks by its North Korea in recent years, with many targeting government websites and facilities.

North Korea is believed to have specially-trained hackers based overseas, including in China.

Pyonyang has accused South Korea of “fabricating” the claims.

News that North Korea is likely to have accessed the Seoul-Washington plans for all-out war in the Koreas will do nothing to soothe tensions between the US and North Korea.

The US and North Korea have been at verbal loggerheads over Pyongyang’s nuclear activities, with the US pressing for a halt to missile tests and the North vowing to continue them.

North Korea recently claimed to have successfully tested a miniaturized hydrogen bomb, which could be loaded onto a long-range missile.

In a speech at the UN last month, President Donald Trump threatened to destroy North Korea if it menaced the US or its allies, and said its leader “is on a suicide mission”.

Kim Jong-un responded with a rare statement, vowing to “tame the mentally deranged US dotard with fire”.

President Trump’s latest comment took the form of a cryptic tweet at the weekend, where he warned that “only one thing will work” in dealing with North Korea, after years of talks had proved fruitless. The president did not elaborate further.

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The International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) has been awarded the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize.

The Geneva-based group was formed in 2007 and inspired by a similar campaign to ban the use of landmines.

As a coalition of hundreds of NGOs from across the world, they have highlighted the humanitarian risk of nuclear weapons.

The group’s 10 years of advocacy helped pave the way for the introduction of a UN treaty banning the weapons, which was signed this year.

While 122 countries backed the treaty, the talks were notably boycotted by the world’s nine known nuclear powers and the only NATO member to discuss it, the Netherlands, voted against.

Berit Reiss-Andersen, the Nobel committee chair, said: “We live in a world where the risk of nuclear weapons being used is greater than it has been for a long time.”

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Tensions between President Donald Trump and North Korea have been mounting for several months over North Korea’s nuclear ambitions.

President Trump is also threatening to withdraw from an agreement which monitors and limits Iran’s nuclear development.

In a statement posted on Facebook, ICAN said the prize “shines a needed light on the path the ban treaty provides towards a world free of nuclear weapons”.

“This is a time of great global tension, when fiery rhetoric could all too easily lead us, inexorably, to unspeakable horror,” the statement read.

“If ever there were a moment for nations to declare their unequivocal opposition to nuclear weapons, that moment is now.”

The number of nuclear weapons worldwide has been steadily decreasing since the 1980s, but none of the world’s nuclear powers have fully disarmed – an ambition set out in the 1970 Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT).

Nuclear armed nations boycotted the latest talks because they favor working within the NPT’s original framework to reduce stockpiles.

Unlike the NPT, the 2017 treaty explicitly bans nuclear weapons. It calls for signatories not to develop, test or threaten to use the weapons. It also forbids nations from having weapons tactically stationed in their countries from allied partners.

However, so far it has only been acceded to by 53 of the world’s countries including Cuba, Ireland and New Zealand.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson has said that the US is in “direct contact” with North Korea.

He also said Washington was “probing” the possibility of talks with Pyongyang, “so stay tuned”.

During a trip to China, Rex Tillerson said: “We have lines of communications to Pyongyang.

“We’re not in a dark situation.”

In recent months, North Korea and the US have engaged in heated rhetoric, but it was not previously known they had lines of communication.

President Donald Trump has threatened to annihilate North Korea, saying Kim Jong-un, “is on a suicide mission”, which led the North Korean leader to release a statement vowing to “tame the mentally deranged US dotard with fire”.

On September 30, North Korea continued the rhetoric, releasing a statement calling President Trump an “old psychopath” bent on the “suicidal act of inviting a nuclear disaster that will reduce America to a sea of flames”.

Photo AP

China to Close Down North Korean Companies Operating In Its Territory

US Denies War Declaration Against North Korea

US Extends Travel Ban to North Korea, Venezuela and Chad

The war of words comes against a backdrop of repeated missile tests and North Korea’s claim that, on September 3, it successfully tested a miniaturized hydrogen bomb which could be loaded on to a long-range missile.

The tests were internationally condemned, with the UN bringing in sanctions against the secretive country in an attempt to force it to stop its weapons program.

Rex Tillerson is in China meeting with President Xi Jinping and other officials, hoping to encourage them to implement the sanctions.

China this week told North Korean businesses operating in its territory to close down. However, China remains keen to see negotiations with North Korea.

President Trump said last month that “talking is not the answer”.

However, there were reports of so-called back channels between the two administrations.

According to the Associated Press, the US and North Korea had been engaged in quiet discussions for months, with “diplomatic contact… occurring regularly” between the US envoy for North Korea policy and “a senior North Korean diplomat at the country’s UN mission”.

Rex Tillerson has also previously hinted there are channels available between the two countries, AP added.

More widely known is the role Sweden plays in negotiating with North Korea on Washington’s behalf.

In August, Ulv Hanssen from the Swedish Institute of International Affairs told Reuters Sweden could step in again because it was trusted by both US and North Korea.

“Sweden has done so on numerous occasions before, especially in relation to imprisoned Americans,” he said.

The Swedish Foreign Ministry declined to comment on the speculation.

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China will close down the North Korean companies operating in its territory as it implements United Nations sanctions against the reclusive state.

The North Korean companies will be shut by early January. Joint Chinese and North Korean ventures will also be forced to close.

China, North Korea’s only major ally, has already banned textile trade and limited oil exports.

The move is part of an international response to North Korea’s sixth and most powerful nuclear test.

The UN Security Council, of which China is a member, voted unanimously for fresh sanctions on September 11.

China’s commerce ministry said it had set a deadline of 120 days from the passing of the resolution for any North Korean companies within its borders to close.

North Korea is politically and economically isolated, and the vast majority of its trade is with China.

Image source Wikimedia

US Denies War Declaration Against North Korea

US Extends Travel Ban to North Korea, Venezuela and Chad

North Korea Warns that More Sanctions Will Accelerate Its Nuclear Program

China has traditionally been protective of North Korea, but has sharply criticized its nuclear tests and escalating rhetoric.

Earlier this year, China clamped down on its purchase of coal from North Korea and on seafood and iron trade across the border.

Coupled with the textile trade ban, Pyongyang has lost several of its scant sources of foreign currency income.

China has been under public pressure to take action from President Donald Trump, who has both applauded and denounced Chinese policy at different times.

President Trump has also been involved in a direct war of words with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, labeling him a “rocket man” on “a suicide mission”. He warned that he would have no choice but to “totally destroy” North Korea if forced to defend the US or its allies.

Kim Jong-un, in turn, has called Donald Trump “deranged” and a “dotard”, and said the US president’s comments have convinced him he is right to seek a nuclear deterrent, and has even accused President Trump of declaring war.

At a news briefing on September 28, China’s foreign ministry spokesman Lu Kang said: “We are opposed to any war on the Korean peninsula.”

“Sanctions and the promoting of talks are both the requirements of the UN Security Council. We should not overemphasize one aspect while ignoring the other.”

The US has denied a war declaration against North Korea.

A statement from North Korea on September 25 accuses Washington of declaring war.

The White House also warned North Korea to stop provocations after it said it had the right to shoot down US bombers.

A UN spokesman said fiery talk could lead to fatal misunderstandings.

Meanwhile, South Korea has called for a level-headed response, warning that accidental clashes in the region could quickly spiral out of control.

North Korean Foreign Minister Ri Yong-ho told reporters on September 25 that “the whole world should clearly remember it was the US who first declared war on our country”.

Ri Yong-ho’s comments were a response to a tweet from President Donald Trump suggesting North Korea would not “be around much longer” if its leaders continued their rhetoric.

Image source Wikimedia

US Extends Travel Ban to North Korea, Venezuela and Chad

Pentagon: US Bombers Fly Close to North Korea’s East Coast In Show of Force

North Korea Warns that More Sanctions Will Accelerate Its Nuclear Program

North Korea Launches New Ballistic Missile over Japan

On September 24, US warplanes flew close to North Korea’s coast in a show of force.

Speaking as he left New York after the UN General Assembly, Ri Yong-ho said his country had the right to shoot down US warplanes even if they were not in North Korea’s airspace.

On September 25, White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders said the US had “not declared war against North Korea and frankly the suggestion of that is absurd”.

Pentagon spokesman Col. Robert Manning reacted by saying: “If North Korea does not stop their provocative actions, you know, we will make sure that we provide options to the president to deal with North Korea.”

South Korea – technically at war with North Korea since the 1950s – called for “astuteness and steadfastness” in responding to what it describes as continued provocations by Pyongyang.

Speaking in New York, South Korean Foreign Minister Kang Kyung-wha called for the prevention of any “further escalation of tensions, or any kind of accidental military clashes in the region which can quickly spiral out of control”.

South Korea’s intelligence service said North Korea was readjusting the position of its military aircraft and strengthening its coastal defenses, according to the South’s news agency Yonhap.

Stéphane Dujarric, a spokesman for UN Secretary General António Guterres, said that “fiery talk can lead to fatal misunderstandings” and that “the only solution for this is a political solution”.

China’s ambassador to the UN, Liu Jieyi, told Reuters: “We want things to calm down.

“It’s getting too dangerous and it’s in nobody’s interest.”

Despite weeks of tension, experts have played down the risk of direct conflict.

North Korea has continued to carry out nuclear and ballistic missile tests in recent weeks, in defiance of successive rounds of UN sanctions.

Pyongyang says nuclear capabilities are its only deterrent against an outside world seeking to destroy it.

After North Korea’s latest and most powerful nuclear test earlier this month, the UN Security Council approved new sanctions on the country.

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The Pentagon has said that US bombers have flown close to North Korea’s east coast to demonstrate the military options available to defeat any threat.

It said the flight was the farthest north of the demilitarized zone (DMZ) between the two Koreas that any US fighter jet or bomber had flown in the 21st Century.

Tensions have risen recently over North Korea’s nuclear program.

At the UN, North Korea’s foreign minister Ri Yong-ho said President Donald Trump was on a “suicide mission”.

Ri Yong-ho’s comments to the General Assembly mimicked President Trump’s remarks at the UN on September 20, when he called North Korean leader Kim Jong-un a “rocket man on a suicide mission”.

The North Korean foreign minister added that “insults” by President Trump – who was, he said, “mentally deranged and full of megalomania” – were an “irreversible mistake making it inevitable” that North Korean rockets would hit the US mainland.

Photo AP

North Korea Warns that More Sanctions Will Accelerate Its Nuclear Program

North Korea Launches New Ballistic Missile over Japan

North Korea Launches Fiery Attack on US Following UN Sanctions

President Trump, the foreign minister said, would “pay dearly” for his speech, in which he also said he would “totally destroy” North Korea if the US was forced to defend itself or its allies.

Donald Trump responded to the speech on Twitter by saying Ri Yong-ho and Kim Jong-un “won’t be around much longer” if they continue their rhetoric.

Shortly before his address, the Pentagon announced that the show of force underscored “the seriousness” with which the US took North Korea’s “reckless” behavior, calling the country’s weapons program a “grave threat”.

“This mission is a demonstration of US resolve and a clear message that the president has many military options to defeat any threat,” the Pentagon said in a statement.

“We are prepared to use the full range of military capabilities to defend the US homeland and our allies.”

US Air Force B-1B Lancer bombers from Guam, escorted by Air Force F-15C Eagle fighters from Okinawa, Japan, flew in international airspace, the Pentagon added.

The flight follows a week of heated rhetoric between the leaders of both countries – after President Trump’s comments, Kim Jong-un called him “mentally deranged” and “a dotard”.

Ri Yong-ho did not comment on the Pentagon’s announcement.

North Korea has refused to stop its missile and nuclear tests, despite successive rounds of UN sanctions. The North Korean leaders say nuclear capabilities are its only deterrent against an outside world seeking to destroy it.

After North Korea’s latest and most powerful nuclear test earlier this month, the UN Security Council approved new sanctions on the country.

However, speaking at the UN, Ri Yong-ho repeated that the restrictions would not make the country stop its nuclear development.

Meanwhile, a 3.4-magnitude tremor was detected near North Korea’s nuclear test site on September 23, but experts believe it was a natural earthquake.

The earthquake was recorded at a depth of 0km in North Hamgyong province, home to the Punggye-ri site, South Korea’s meteorological agency said.

The US Geological Survey (USGS) also said it occurred in the nuclear test area, but added that its seismologists assessed it as having a depth of 5km.

South Korea said no specific sound waves generated by artificial earthquakes were detected.

China’s Earthquake Administration said the quake was not a nuclear explosion and had the characteristics of a natural tremor. The agency had initially said it was a “suspected explosion”.

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North Korea warns that more sanctions and pressure will only make it accelerate its nuclear program.

In a strongly worded statement, North Korea called a new set of UN sanctions “the most vicious, unethical and inhumane act of hostility”.

Meanwhile, President Donald Trump and his Chinese counterpart committed to “maximizing pressure” on North Korea through vigorous enforcement of UN resolutions.

Earlier, the US and South Korea carried out joint military exercises.

North Korea fired its latest missile over Japan on September 15. It traveled 2,300 miles, putting the US Pacific territory of Guam, which North Korea says it has a plan to target, within reach.

Image source YouTube

North Korea Launches New Ballistic Missile over Japan

North Korea Launches Fiery Attack on US Following UN Sanctions

North Korea Claims It Has Developed Hydrogen Bomb

The launch followed a fresh round of UN sanctions and was unanimously condemned by the UN Security Council as “highly provocative”.

The foreign ministry statement, carried by North Korea’s official news agency KCNA, said: “The increased moves of the US and its vassal forces to impose sanctions and pressure on the DPRK [Democratic People’s Republic of Korea] will only increase our pace towards the ultimate completion of the state nuclear force.”

North Korea also said that the goal of the new UN sanctions, approved on September 11, was to “physically exterminate” the country’s people, system and government.

The sanctions are an attempt to starve North Korea of fuel and income for its weapons programs, and restrict oil imports and ban textile exports.

The fresh measures followed the sixth and most powerful nuclear test conducted by North Korea earlier this month.

However, some critics have raised questions over the effectiveness of the restrictions, as North Korea is still able to trade internationally.

North Korea’s commerce with China, its main ally, was partially responsible for an estimated economic growth of 3.9% in 2016, Bloomberg news agency reports.

The issue of North Korea’s weapons program is expected to dominate President Donald Trump’s address at the UN General Assembly and his meetings with the leaders of South Korea and Japan.

President Trump previously warned that “all options” were on the table and that North Korea would face “fire and fury” if it continued to threaten the US.

In a phone call on September 18, President Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping committed to “maximizing pressure on North Korea through vigorous enforcement” of UN Security Council resolutions, the White House said.

Russia has also criticized what it describes as “aggressive rhetoric” from the US.

China and Russia only agreed to the new UN sanctions after they were softened by Washington.

North Korea has fired a new ballistic missile over Japan, creating new tension in the region after its nuclear bomb test less than two weeks ago.

According to South Korean military, the missile reached an altitude of about 770km (478 miles), travelling 3,700km before landing in the sea off Hokkaido.

The missile flew higher and further than one fired over Japan late last month.

Japan’s PM Shinzo Abe said his country would “never tolerate” such “dangerous provocative action”.

South Korea responded within minutes by firing two ballistic missiles into the sea in a simulated strike on North Korea.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson also condemned the launch and the UN Security Council will meet later on September 15 in New York at the request of America and Japan.

The launch took place from the Sunan airfield north of Pyongyang just before 07:00 local time, South Korea’s military says.

Image source Wikipedia

North Korea Fires Missile over Northern Japan

North Korea Launches Fiery Attack on US Following UN Sanctions

North Korea Crisis: Kim Jong-un Is Begging for War, Says US Ambassador to UN

As with the last test on 29 August, the missile flew over Japan’s northern Hokkaido island before splashing down in the Pacific Ocean. There were no immediate reports of damage to aircraft or ships.

Sirens sounded across the region and text message alerts were sent out warning people to take cover.

According to observers, it is likely to have been an intermediate range ballistic missile (IRBM) though Japanese officials believe there is still a possibility it was an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM).

What is so alarming about the new launch is that the US Pacific territory of Guam, which North Korea says it has plans to fire missiles towards, is 3,400km from Pyongyang, putting it within range of the latest missile.

Sanctions on North Korea were tightened this week in response to its sixth nuclear test on 3 September, which reportedly involved a miniaturized hydrogen bomb that could be loaded on to a long-range missile.

After the latest round of sanctions, it is not clear what other course of action is open to the UN Security Council.

Only on September 11, the UN Security Council voted to restrict oil imports and ban textile exports, in an attempt to starve North Korea of fuel and income for its weapons programs.

Salvează

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North Korea has launched a fiery attack on the US, threatening with the “greatest pain” it has ever suffered, following new sanctions imposed by the UN.

Its ambassador to the UN accused Washington of opting for “political, economic and military confrontation”.

President Donald Trump said the move was nothing compared to what would have to happen to deal with North Korea.

The UN sanctions are an attempt to starve the country of fuel and income for its weapons programs.

The new measures restrict oil imports and ban textile exports, and were approved after North Korea’s sixth and largest nuclear test earlier this month.

North Korea’s ambassador to the UN Han Tae Song said he “categorically rejected” what he called an “illegal resolution”.

“The forthcoming measures by DPRK [the Democratic Republic of Korea] will make the US suffer the greatest pain it has ever experienced in its history,” he told a UN conference in Geneva.

“Instead of making [the] right choice with rational analysis… the Washington regime finally opted for political, economic and military confrontation, obsessed with the wild dream of reversing the DPRK’s development of nuclear force – which has already reached the completion phase.”

Photo AP

US Wants New Sanctions Against North Korea Including Freeze on Kim Jong-un’s Assets

North Korea Claims It Has Developed Hydrogen Bomb

North Korea Fires Missile over Northern Japan

The UN resolution was only passed unanimously after North Korea’s allies Russia and China agreed to softer sanctions than those proposed by the US.

The initial text included a total ban on oil imports, a measure seen by some analysts as potentially destabilizing for the North Korean regime.

The new sanctions agreed by the UN include:

  • Limits on imports of crude oil and oil products. China, North Korea’s main economic ally, supplies most of the country’s crude oil.
  • A ban on exports of textiles, which is Pyongyang’s second-biggest export worth more than $700 million a year.
  • A ban on new visas for North Korean overseas workers, which the US estimates would eventually cut off $500 million of tax revenue per year.

A proposed asset freeze and a travel ban on Kim Jong-un were dropped.

Reacting on September 13, President Donald Trump said: “We think it’s just another very small step, not a big deal.”

“I don’t know if it has any impact, but certainly it was nice to get a 15 to nothing vote. But those sanctions are nothing compared to what ultimately will have to happen,” the president added, without giving details.

The US ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley told the Security Council after the vote: “We don’t take pleasure in further strengthening sanctions today. We are not looking for war.”

“The North Korean regime has not yet passed the point of no return,” she added.

“If North Korea continues its dangerous path, we will continue with further pressure. The choice is theirs.”

The September 11 resolution against North Korea was the ninth one unanimously adopted by the UN since 2006.

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The US is seeking a range of new UN sanctions against North Korea, including an oil ban and a freeze on leader Kim Jong-un’s assets.

The draft resolution circulated to the Security Council members comes after Pyongyang’s sixth nuclear test and repeated missile launches.

North Korea also claims to have developed a hydrogen bomb and continues to threaten to strike the US.

China and Russia are both expected to oppose further sanctions.

Pyongyangis already under highly restrictive sanctions imposed by the UN that are intended to force the leadership to curtail its weapons programs.

In August, a new round of sanctions banned exports including coal, costing North Korea an estimated $1 billion – about a third of its entire export economy.

However, some trade avenues remain open to it.

The draft US proposal calls for a total ban on supplying a range of oil products to North Korea and a ban on its textile export industry.

It also suggests freezing the assets of Kim Jong-un and the North Korean government, as well as banning him and other senior officials from travelling.

North Korean laborers would also be banned from working abroad, principally in Russia’s Far East and China.

Remittances from foreign earnings and textile exports are two of the most important remaining sources of income for North Korea.

However, it is not clear how China and Russia, which both supply oil to North Korea and wield vetoes at the Security Council, will respond to the US move.

Photo AP

North Korea Crisis: Kim Jong-un Is Begging for War, Says US Ambassador to UN

North Korea Claims It Has Developed Hydrogen Bomb

North Korea Fires Missile over Northern Japan

On September 7, China’s foreign minister Wang Yi told reporters that the council should respond further “by taking necessary measures”, but did not elaborate.

Wang Yi added that “sanctions and pressure are only half of the key to resolving the issue. The other half is dialogue and negotiation.”

China is both North Korea’s and the US’s biggest trade partner, and has supported recent sanctions against it.

President Vladimir Putin has argued that the amount of oil Russia exports to North Korea – some 40,000 tonnes – is negligible.

“It is not worth giving in to emotions and driving North Korea into a corner,” President Putin said.

Both China and Russia have been pushing for an alternative solution.

They are proposing that the US and ally South Korea stop their military drills – which anger the North – and end the deployment of the controversial anti-missile THAAD system in South Korea, in return for North Korea ceasing its nuclear and missile program.

The proposal has been rejected by the US and South Korea.

On September 7, South Korea’s military announced it had completed the deployment of THAAD, Yonhap reported.

South Korean President Moon Jae-in also met with Japan’s PM Shinzo Abe, where both agreed to push for greater sanctions. Shinzo Abe called for “the greatest possible pressure” to be put on North Korea.

President Donald Trump had previously warned the US could cut off trade with countries that do business with North Korea.

The US has indicated that if the resolution is not passed when the Security Council meets on September 11 it may impose its own sanctions unilaterally.

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin told reporters on September 6: “We believe that we need to economically cut off North Korea.

“I have an executive order prepared. It’s ready to go to the president. It will authorize me to… put sanctions on anybody that does trade with North Korea.”

President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping also discussed North Korea over the phone on Wednesday, where they agreed to “take further action”, said a White House statement.

Donald Trump, who has previously threatened a military response to North Korea, told reporters this was “not our first choice”, but did not rule it out.

He added: “President Xi would like to do something. We’ll see whether or not he can do it. But we will not be putting up with what’s happening in North Korea.”

Chinese state news agency Xinhua reported that President Xi called for a “peaceful settlement of the issue” involving “dialogue combined with a set of comprehensive measures”.

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North Korea claims that it has successfully tested a nuclear weapon that could be loaded onto a long-range missile.

Pyongyang said its sixth nuclear test was a “perfect success”, hours after seismologists had detected an earth tremor.

North Korea said it had tested a hydrogen bomb – a device many times more powerful than an atomic bomb.

Analysts say the claims should be treated with caution, but its nuclear capability is clearly advancing.

Pyonyang last carried out a nuclear test in September 2016. It has defied UN sanctions and international pressure to develop nuclear weapons and to test missiles which could potentially reach the mainland US.

Image source CNN

Kim Jong-un Suggests North Korea Has Hydrogen Bomb

North Korea Successfully Tests First Hydrogen Bomb

North Korea Hydrogen Bomb: US, South Korea and Japan United in Response

According to South Korean officials, the latest test took place in Kilju County, where North Korea’s Punggye-ri nuclear test site is situated.

The “artificial quake” was 9.8 times more powerful than the tremor from North Korea’s fifth test, the state weather agency said.

It came hours after Pyongyang said it had miniaturized a hydrogen bomb for use on a long-range missile, and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un was pictured with what state media said was a new type of hydrogen bomb. State media said the device could be loaded on to a ballistic missile.

Initial reports from the US Geological Survey put the tremor at 5.6-magnitude with a depth of 6 miles but this was later upgraded to 6.3-magnitude at 0 miles. This would make it North Korea’s most powerful nuclear test to date.

Japan condemned the test and South Korean President Moon Jae-in convened emergency security council talks.

A series of recent missile tests has caused growing international unease.

In a report on September 3, North Korea’s state news agency KCNA said Kim Jong-un had visited scientists at the nuclear weapons institute and “guided the work for nuclear weaponization”.

The report said: “The institute recently succeeded in making a more developed nuke.”

“He (Kim Jong-un) watched an H-bomb to be loaded into a new ICBM (intercontinental ballistic missile),” it added.

The report carried pictures of Kim Jong-un inspecting the device. It described the weapon as “a multi-functional thermonuclear nuke with great destructive power which can be detonated even at high altitudes”.

International experts say North Korea has made advances in its nuclear weapons capabilities but it is unclear if it has successfully miniaturized a nuclear weapon it can load on to a missile.

North Korea has previously claimed to have miniaturized a nuclear weapon but experts have cast doubt on this. There is also skepticism about North Korea’s claims to have developed a hydrogen bomb, which is more powerful than an atomic bomb.

Hydrogen bombs use fusion – the merging of atoms – to unleash huge amounts of energy, whereas atomic bombs use nuclear fission, or the splitting of atoms.

North Korea has fired a missile over northern Japan.

Japanese PM Shinzo Abe called the move an “unprecedented” threat to his country.

The missile, launched early on August 29, flew over Hokkaido Island before crashing into the sea.

The UN Security Council is expected to hold an emergency meeting in response.

North Korea has conducted a flurry of missile tests recently, but this is the first time it has fired what is thought to be a ballistic weapon over Japan.

Image source Wikipedia

North Korea Fires Three Short-Range Ballistic Missiles

North Korea Crisis: US Imposes Sanctions on Chinese and Russian Companies

North Korea: Kim Jong-un to Wait and See before Taking Action on Guam Strike

On the two previous occasions its rockets crossed Japan – in 1998 and 2009 – North Korea said they were for satellite launch vehicles, not weapons.

According to the South Korean military, the missile was fired eastward just before 06:00 local time from near Pyongyang – which is rare.

Early analysis of the launch suggests the missile flew a distance of more than 1,680 miles and reached a maximum altitude of about 342 miles, lower than most previous North Korean tests. The missile was likely a Hwasong-12, a newly developed intermediate range weapon, and fell into the North Pacific Ocean 740 miles off the Japanese coast after breaking into three pieces.

No effort was made by the Japanese to shoot down the missile but it issued a safety warning telling citizens in Hokkaido to take shelter in “a sturdy building or basement”.

US and Japanese forces are currently taking part in training drills in Hokkaido.

South Korea’s President Moon Jae-in ordered a show of “overwhelming” force in response to the launch. Four South Korean jets staged a live bombing drill on August 29.

Japan’s PM Shinzo Abe said he had spoken to President Donald Trump and that both agreed to increase pressure on North Korea.

Shinzo Abe said the North Korea’s “reckless action is an unprecedented, serious and a grave threat to our nation” which also “greatly damages regional peace and security”.

The prime minister said his government was doing its utmost to protect people’s lives.

North Korea’s conventional and nuclear weapons programs are a breach of international sanctions, so the test is being seen as a major provocation and an escalation of tensions on the Korean peninsula.

Earlier this month, North Korea threatened to fire missiles towards the US Pacific territory of Guam, while President Donald Trump warned Pyongyang would face “fire and fury” if it continued to threaten the US.

There have also been some reports in recent months that North Korea is preparing to carry out its sixth nuclear test.

However, last week, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said the fact that North Korea had not carried out any missile launches since the UN imposed a fresh round of sanctions was an indication of restraint by Pyongyang.

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According to the US military, North Korea has fired three short-range ballistic missiles.

The missiles were launched from a site in the North Korean province of Gangwon and flew for about 150 miles, officials in South Korea said.

Since firing an intercontinental ballistic weapon last month, North Korea has threatened to aim missiles at the US Pacific territory of Guam.

However, this latest test did not threaten the US or Guam, the US military said.

Image source Wikipedia

North Korea Crisis: US Imposes Sanctions on Chinese and Russian Companies

North Korea: Kim Jong-un to Wait and See before Taking Action on Guam Strike

Donald Trump: “US Military Is Locked and Loaded to Deal with North Korea”

North Korean missile tests often come in response to South Korean military exercises involving the US.

Thousands of US and South Korean troops are currently taking part in joint military drills, which are mainly largely computer-simulated exercises.

The projectiles were launched at 06:49 on August 26, South Korea’s defense ministry said.

The US military initially reported that two of the missiles had failed but, according to its later assessment, one appears to have blown up almost immediately while two flew about 155 miles in a north-easterly direction.

The launches were spread over a period of 30 minutes, an official said.

The South Korean defense ministry said: “The military is keeping a tight surveillance over the North to cope with further provocations.”

The US has hit a dozen Russian and Chinese companies and individuals with sanctions over helping North Korea’s nuclear weapons program.

The move comes after the UN Security Council, including Russia and China, voted for further sanctions against North Korea.

The US Treasury said its actions would “increase pressure” on North Korea, but the move has angered China.

Meanwhile, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson praised North Korea for “a level of restraint” in recent days.

He said: “We have had no missile launches or provocative acts on the part of North Korea since the unanimous adoption of the UN Security Council resolution.”

This, Rex Tillerson said, could pave the way for talks between the two sides “sometime in the near future”.

Photo AP

Gen Joseph Dunford: North Korea War Would Be Horrific

North Korea: Kim Jong-un to Wait and See before Taking Action on Guam Strike

Donald Trump: “US Military Is Locked and Loaded to Deal with North Korea”

The US Office of Foreign Assets Control designated 10 companies and six individuals in its sanctions.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said: “[The] Treasury will continue to increase pressure on North Korea by targeting those who support the advancement of nuclear and ballistic missile programs, and isolating them from the American financial system.”

The action means American individuals and companies are no longer permitted to do business with these companies.

China responded swiftly, calling on the US to “immediately correct its mistake” of punishing its companies.

A series of missile tests by North Korea in recent months – along with its repeated threats to carry out a sixth test of a nuclear device – have increased tensions between Pyongyang and the US.

North Korea has been angered, as it is every year, by scheduled US-South Korea military drills, and threatened to launch missiles near the US island of Guam in the South Pacific.

President Donald Trump, meanwhile, threatened the isolated regime with “fire and fury like the world has never seen”.

In North Korea’s latest propaganda video, released on August 22, an image of President Trump is shown at a cemetery which is apparently meant to be in Guam.

Vice-president Mike Pence is also pictured engulfed in flames.

Rex Tillerson’s comments on August 22 appeared to strike a more conciliatory tone.

The secretary of state said North Korea had not launched any missiles since the UN unilaterally imposed new sanctions, and had “demonstrated some level of restraint that we’ve not seen in the past”.

“We hope that this is the beginning of this signal that we’ve been looking for – that they are ready to restrain their level of tensions, they’re ready to restrain their provocative acts and that perhaps we are seeing our pathway to sometime in the near future having some dialogue,” he said.

However, speaking at UN-backed disarmament conference in Geneva on August 22, a North Korean diplomat insisted that the weapons program was “justifiable and a legitimate option for self-defense”.

He said: “As long as the U.S. hostile policy and nuclear threat remains unchallenged, the DPRK will never place its self-defensive nuclear deterrence on the negotiating table or step back an inch from the path it took to bolster the national nuclear force.”

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According to General Joseph Dunford, the top military adviser to President Donald Trump, a military response to North Korea would be “horrific” but remains an option.

The US Joint Chiefs of Staff made the comments while visiting China.

Gen. Joseph Dunford was responding to remarks by a top Trump aide ruling out military action over North Korea’s nuclear program.

Tensions have flared between the US and North Korea after Pyongyang made advances in its missile testing.

President Trump has warned North Korea that it faces “fire and fury”, while Pyongyang has threatened to strike the American territory of Guam.

However, the sharp rhetoric of last week has since softened, with North Korea leader Kim Jong-un putting the Guam plans on hold – a move praised by President Trump.

Image source Wikimedia

North Korea: Kim Jong-un to Wait and See before Taking Action on Guam Strike

Donald Trump: “US Military Is Locked and Loaded to Deal with North Korea”

UN Security Council Agrees on Fresh Sanctions Against North Korea

On August 16, White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon said there could be no military solution to the stand-off.

He told The American Prospect: “Until somebody solves the part of the equation that shows me that 10 million people in Seoul don’t die in the first 30 minutes from conventional weapons, I don’t know what you’re talking about, there’s no military solution here, they got us.”

Gen. Dunford agreed a military solution would be “horrific” but went on to say “what’s unimaginable to me is not a military option”.

“What is unimaginable is allowing [North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un] to develop ballistic missiles with a nuclear warhead that can threaten the United States and continue to threaten the region.”

He said President Trump “has told us to develop credible, viable military options, and that’s exactly what we’re doing”.

A senior Chinese military official who met Gen. Joseph Dunford told him that military action should be ruled out and that “dialogue” was the only option, the Chinese defense ministry said.

China is North Korea’s only major ally. The US has criticized China for not doing enough to rein it in, but Beijing says it has begun halting iron, iron ore and seafood imports from North Korea, in line with new UN sanctions.

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According to North Korean state media, supreme leader Kim Jong-un reviewed plans to fire missiles towards the US Pacific territory of Guam but will hold off.

Although prepared for “the enveloping fire at Guam”, North Korea said it would watch what “the foolish Yankees” do before taking a decision.

Last week’s threat against Guam escalated the sharp rhetoric being exchanged between the two sides.

This latest report points to a pause in the increasingly bitter war of words.

Meanwhile, South Korean President Moon Jae-in has urged the US not to launch an attack on the Korean peninsula without its consent, saying “no one may decide to take military action without the consent” of the South.

The KCNA report said Kim Jong-un “examined the plan for a long time” and discussed it with senior military officials.

Kim Jong-un was now merely waiting for orders “after rounding off the preparations for the enveloping fire at Guam”.

However, crucially, the report also said that Kim Jong-un would watch the US before making any decision, signaling an apparent deceleration in the provocative rhetoric.

North Korea Planning to Fire Four Missile Near Guam

Donald Trump: “US Military Is Locked and Loaded to Deal with North Korea”

North Korea Warns US over Fresh UN Sanctions

Correspondents say that after days of menacing threats it might seem that the North Korean leader could be in the mood to finally hit the pause button – but in a nation as secretive as North Korea, one can never be sure.

Analysts say it could simply mean North Korea is not fully ready to launch an attack on Guam, so it could just be buying more time.

South Korea and China – North Korea’s closest ally – have been urging calm and a renewed push for diplomatic resolutions.

On August 15, South Korean President Moon Jae-in said the US should not act unilaterally. The two countries’ defense agreement states that they must “consult together” when either is threatened.

On August 14, China’s foreign ministry reiterated its “suspension for suspension proposal” where North Korea stops its missile tests in exchange for a freeze on military exercises by the US and South Korea.

Defense Secretary James Mattis earlier warned that any attack could quickly escalate into war, and if North Korea fired a missile towards Guam, “then it’s game on.”

He told reporters that the US military would defend the country “from any attack, at any time and from any quarter”.

James Mattis also sought to reassure residents of Guam, home to US military bases and about 160,000 people, that they were well-protected and if a missile was fired, “we’ll take it out”.