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A new abuse lawsuit has been filed against former Penn State assistant coach Jerry Sandusky.

The new accuser claims he was abused about six years ago.

The case was filed in Philadelphia last month by Williamsport attorney Bret Southard, whose client was identified only by his initials, The Centre Daily Times reported.

The lawsuit claims Jerry Sandusky abused the boy during a shopping trip in 2008 or 2009, and after they attended a Penn State game in 2008 against Coastal Carolina University.

The trip would have come around the time law enforcement officials began investigating Sandusky in late 2008, based on a complaint involving a student in central Pennsylvania. They charged him in 2011.

Jerry Sandusky was convicted in 2012 for abusing ten boys and is serving a lengthy state prison sentence

Jerry Sandusky was convicted in 2012 for abusing ten boys and is serving a lengthy state prison sentence (photo ABC News)

Bret Southard told the newspaper his client represents a new case. The lawsuit seeks $550,000, along with punitive damages and interest. Penn State previously settled 26 cases for nearly $60 million.

The lawsuit describes the boy as a participant in The Second Mile, the charity for at-risk children Sandusky founded, the newspaper reported.

Second Mile official David Woodle said the charity would “engage with them and try just to understand what’s there and take it through the legal process”. He said The Second Mile now exists only as the owner of real estate that is currently for sale.

Jerry Sandusky, 70, was convicted two years ago for abusing ten boys and is serving a lengthy state prison sentence.


The lawsuit said the accuser was among the boys listed as Second Mile participants on a document taken from Jerry Sandusky’s home during the investigation. Some of the names had check marks next to them.

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Matthew Sandusky, the adopted son of imprisoned former Penn State defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky, speaks out about his ordeal in an interview with Oprah Winfrey.

Matt Sandusky’s first public interview will air on July 17 when he will answer questions from Oprah Winfrey on the Oprah Winfrey Network (OWN) at 9 p.m. ET, Huffington Post reported.

Matt Sandusky's first public interview will air on July 17 when he will answer questions from Oprah Winfrey on the OWN

Matt Sandusky’s first public interview will air on July 17 when he will answer questions from Oprah Winfrey on the OWN (photo OWN)

In the interview, Matthew Sandusky – currently married and a father himself – will describe the ordeal he endured while being raised by Jerry and Dottie Sandusky.

According to the publication, Matthew Sandusky will respond to Dottie Sandusky’s accusations against her husband’s victims and share details on Jerry Sandusky’s nightly ritual. He is one of six children Jerry and Dottie Sandusky adopted.

Jerry Sandusky was convicted in June 2012 on 45 counts of child abuse, found guilty of raping or fondling 10 boys he had met through the acclaimed youth charity he founded, The Second Mile.

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In a recent interview, Jerry Sandusky’s wife – Dottie Sandusky – revealed she still had hope even after his 45-count guilty verdict.

The former Penn State assistant football coach has been arrested, tried and convicted of abusing ten boys.

When the judge handed down a 30- to 60-year prison term for her husband, Dottie Sandusky said she fully comprehended his predicament.

Jerry Sandusky, 70, was convicted in 2012 of abusing ten boys over 15 years but maintains his innocence and is pursuing appeals. The scandal brought down the Penn State president and storied head coach Joe Paterno and eventually led the school to pay nearly $60 million to settle civil claims. Three former Penn State administrators await trial on charges they covered up allegations against Jerry Sandusky.

In recent weeks, Dottie Sandusky has been granting interviews, arguing her husband’s conviction was unjust and claiming the accusers who testified against him told inaccurate stories to cash in.

Speaking with The Associated Press, Dottie Sandusky said her husband had informed her when complaints were made against him regarding showering with boys in 1998 and 2001.

In recent weeks, Dottie Sandusky has been granting interviews, arguing her husband's conviction was unjust and claiming the accusers who testified against him told inaccurate stories to cash in

In recent weeks, Dottie Sandusky has been granting interviews, arguing her husband’s conviction was unjust and claiming the accusers who testified against him told inaccurate stories to cash in (photo NBC/Today Show)

Those complaints didn’t seem to worry Jerry Sandusky, she said, even though one spawned an investigation by police and child protective services and the other resulted in a restriction against him bringing children into Penn State facilities.

“He didn’t think a thing about it,” Dottie Sandusky said.

She said her husband also told her promptly about a 2010 investigation into his contact with a boy at a high school in central Pennsylvania that forced him to hire a lawyer and led to the filing of criminal charges.

“Jerry said when it first started it was really nothing,” Dottie Sandusky said.

In the interview, Dottie Sandusky repeatedly turned her focus to the eight young men who testified against Jerry Sandusky and the couple dozen others who have contacted Penn State with abuse claims.

“I know who he is, and I know what he is, and people need to look into some of the other situations,” she said.

Cliff Rieders, a Williamsport attorney who represents one of the accusers, said he viewed the interviews being given by Dottie Sandusky as an effort to influence public opinion and possibly help his appeal.

Dottie Sandusky said she is hoping the state Supreme Court grants her husband a new trial; he lost a lower-level appeal and the justices have not said whether they will take the case.

Her claim that witnesses were manipulated into giving false evidence was a key element of her husband’s criminal defense. The fact that jurors were not convinced doesn’t sway her – she said jurors had made up their mind before the trial began.

“I trust my husband,” she said.

Dottie Sandusky, who was a defense witness and did not see others testify, said the accusers’ testimony shouldn’t have been given more credence than her husband’s version of events.

Jerry Sandusky did not take the stand and has declined repeated requests for an interview.

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Matt Sandusky, the son of former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky, took part in Happy Valley documentary about his father’s abuse case that explores whether  his actions were an open secret.

Matt Sandusky tells the Centre Daily Times that he took part in Happy Valley to advocate for child abuse survivors.

Matt Sandusky took part in Happy Valley documentary about Jerry Sandusky's abuse case

Matt Sandusky took part in Happy Valley documentary about Jerry Sandusky’s abuse case

The 100-minute film is being screened this week at the Sundance Film Festival in Utah. It explores whether it was an open secret that Jerry Sandusky was molesting boys.

Matt Sandusky was expected to be a defense witness at Jerry Sandusky’s trial but instead came forward to say that he had been abused by his adoptive father.

Jerry Sandusky is appealing his conviction and 30- to 60-year prison term.

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Penn State has spent $59.7 million on costs related to the scandal involving Jerry Sandusky, who was convicted of child abuse.

Penn State is paying the sum to 26 young men over claims of child abuse at the hands of former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky.

The school said 23 deals are fully signed and three are agreements in principle, but did not disclose the names of the recipients. The school faces six other claims, and the university says it believes some of those do not have merit while others may produce settlements.

University president Rodney Erickson issued a statement calling the announcement a step forward for victims and the school.

“We cannot undo what has been done, but we can and must do everything possible to learn from this and ensure it never happens again at Penn State,” said Rodney Erickson, who announced the day Jerry Sandusky was convicted in June 2012 of 45 criminal counts that Penn State was determined to compensate his victims.

The settlements have been unfolding since mid-August, when attorneys for the accusers began to disclose them. Penn State followed a policy in which it has not been confirming them, waiting instead to announce deals at once.

Penn State has spent $59.7 million on costs related to the scandal involving Jerry Sandusky

Penn State has spent $59.7 million on costs related to the scandal involving Jerry Sandusky

Harrisburg lawyer Ben Andreozzi, who helped negotiate several of the settlements, said his clients were satisfied.

“They felt that the university treated them fairly with the economic and noneconomic terms of the settlement,” said Ben Andreozzi, who also represents some others who have come forward recently. Those new claims have not been presented to the university, he said.

Penn State has spent more than $50 million on other costs related to the Sandusky scandal, including lawyers’ fees, public relations expenses, and adoption of new policies and procedures related to children and abuse complaints.

It said Monday that liability insurance is expected to cover the payments and legal defense, and expenses not covered should be paid from interest paid on loans by Penn State to its self-supporting units.

Jerry Sandusky, 69, has been pursuing appeals while he serves a 30- to 60-year state prison sentence.

He was convicted of abusing 10 boys, some of them at Penn State facilities. Eight young men testified against him.

Jerry Sandusky did not testify at his trial but has long asserted his innocence. He has acknowledged he showered with boys but insisted he never molested them.

The abuse scandal rocked Penn State, bringing down football coach Joe Paterno and leading college sports’ governing body, the NCAA, to levy unprecedented sanctions against the university’s football program.

Three former Penn State administrators await trial in Harrisburg on charges they engaged in a criminal cover-up of the Sandusky scandal. Former president Graham Spanier, retired vice president Gary Schultz and retired athletic director Tim Curley deny the allegations, and a trial date has not been scheduled.

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Matt Sandusky filed for a name change for himself, his wife, and his four children.

This is not the first time that Matt Sandusky has tried to distance himself from his adoptive father, disgraced former Penn State coach Jerry Sandusky .

During Jerry Sandusky’s trial, Matt made a statement after the other victims testified saying that he too was s***ally abused by his adoptive father.

Because the jury had already begun deliberating, Matt Sandusky was not called to go into further detail in the court.

Eight victims testified in court and the stories of two others were relayed for the jurors without having their names released.

Matt Sandusky filed for a name change for himself, his wife, and his four children

Matt Sandusky filed for a name change for himself, his wife, and his four children

Meanwhile Penn State has approved a settlement of about $60 million for the majority of the victims of convicted child molester Jerry Sandusky.

The university board reportedly agreed on the figure during a meeting on Friday but details about the exact break-down of the sum have yet to be released.

Aside from Matt Sandusky, there are a total of 32 plaintiffs who petitioned for financial compensation from Penn State.

The Legal Intelligencer reports that the $60 million settlement covers a majority of those claims, but it does not specify how many exactly or how much each victim receives.

The paper reports, via Deadspin, that “there’s a good chance” that all of the claims will be settled between the school and the victims by the end of the summer.

Jerry Sandusky, 69, was found guilty of 45 of the 48 charges against him.

He was sentenced to spend 60 years behind bars, with the first possibility of parole coming after his first 30 years.

The judge made it clear that even though the maximum possible sentence for the charges was 442 years, he decided that the former coach would spend sufficient time to ensure that he would never be released from the supermax prison in his lifetime.

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Aaron Fisher, one of Jerry Sandusky’s victims claims in his new book that Dottie Sandusky once called down to the basement while he was being attacked and Sandusky dismissed her by saying he was busy.

Aaron Fisher writes in Silent No More that Dottie Sandusky asked her husband to fix a table upstairs but that when he replied he was fixing an air hockey table she dropped the subject.

“Sarge,” Aaron Fisher wrote, using her nickname, “never went down to the basement”.

The basement, according to court testimony, is where Jerry Sandusky abused Aaron Fisher and other boys who stayed overnight at his home.

Aaron Fisher, who was known publicly for a year only as Victim 1, put aside anonymity Friday to speak about his ordeal as a child, telling ABC’s 20/20 he had contemplated suicide because authorities took so long to prosecute Jerry Sandusky, nearly three years after he and his mother first alerted school officials.

The Associated Press bought an early copy of Aaron Fisher’s book, which is being published next week.

Jerry Sandusky didn’t testify at trial but has repeatedly said he is innocent, and Dottie Sandusky has maintained she never saw him behave inappropriately with children.

Not only that, Jerry Sandusky’s lawyer Joe Amendola said Friday: “She said they had a freezer in the basement so she would routinely go down there go get stuff to make for dinner.

“She said had she thought Jerry was doing anything inappropriate, she said he wouldn’t have needed the judicial system.”

In the book, Aaron Fisher’s mother and co-author, Dawn Daniels, recounts meeting Jerry Sandusky after her son had spent a couple of summers at events held by his charity, The Second Mile.

“When Aaron introduced us, Jerry shook my hand, put his arm around Aaron, roughed up his hair and said, <<You got a good kid on your hands there>>,” she said, according to the book.

Silent No More by Jerry Sandusky abuse victim, Aaron Fisher

Silent No More by Jerry Sandusky abuse victim, Aaron Fisher

Aaron Fisher wrote that in an early warning sign, while swimming together he felt Jerry Sandusky’s hand on his crotch a “little too long”. During car rides, he said, Jerry Sandusky had him sit up front and would put his hand on the boy’s thigh.

He first reported the abuse in 2008, but he said the state attorney general’s office told him it needed more victims before Jerry Sandusky would be charged. Jerry Sandusky was arrested last November.

The delay, Aaron Fisher said, made him increasingly desperate.

“I thought maybe it would be easier to take myself out of the equation,” he told ABC.

“Let somebody else deal with it.”

Aaron Fisher, 18, testified at Jerry Sandusky’s trial, which ended with Sandusky convicted of 45 counts of abuse involving Fisher and nine other boys.

Jerry Sandusky, 68, was sentenced this month to 30 to 60 years in prison.

Aaron Fisher said he began spending nights at the Sandusky home in State College, about 30 miles from his own home in Lock Haven, when he was 11. He said kissing and back rubbing during those overnight visits progressed to oral sex. He said he tried to distance himself from Sandusky, to no avail.

He was 15 when he and his mother reported the abuse to a school principal, who responded that “Jerry has a heart of gold and that he wouldn’t do those type of things”, Fisher told ABC, repeating his trial testimony.

In the book, Aaron Fisher describes the moment when he told the principal and a guidance counselor Sandusky had molested him: “All the color when out of their faces. I wouldn’t give them any details, because it was so embarrassing to tell that kind of stuff to women.”

School officials reported Jerry Sandusky to Clinton County Children and Youth Services, which began an investigation and brought in state police.

The AP typically does not name sexual-abuse victims, unless they identify themselves publicly, as Aaron Fisher has done.

Joe Amendola said Aaron Fisher and other accusers were motivated by money, a claim he has repeatedly made.

On Thursday, Joe Amendola filed a document that is the first step in Jerry Sandusky’s effort to overturn his conviction, contending there wasn’t enough evidence against him and the trial wasn’t fair.

The post-sentencing motions attacked rulings by the judge, the closing argument by the prosecution and the speed by which he went from arrest to trial.

Jerry Sandusky wants the charges tossed out and/or a new trial, saying the statute of limitations had run out for many of the counts for which he was convicted in June.

The abuse scandal rocked Penn State, bringing down longtime coach Joe Paterno and the university’s president and leading the NCAA, college sports’ governing body, to levy unprecedented sanctions against the university’s football program.

 

Former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky was today sentenced to 30 years in prison for child sex abuse charges, effectively meaning he will spend the rest of his life in jail.

Wearing a bullet-proof vest and red jumpsuit, a defiant Jerry Sandusky gave a long, rambling statement in which he denied the allegations, talked about his life in prison and the pain of being away from his family.

The sentence, which came hours after he defiantly claimed his innocence and blamed his victims for orchestrating a conspiracy against him, means the 68-year-old cannot be released on parole before the minimum term is up. He plans to appeal.

Three of his victims told the court today of the emotional impact the abuse had on them and are said to have broken down as his sentence was read out.

One victim – who is now a father – talked about not being able to let his son out of his sight because of what happened to him at the hands of the former coach.

The judge said as he was handing down the sentence that the fact Sandusky continued to deny the crimes, ‘in my view makes you dangerous’.

Despite the fact Jerry Sandusky will die in prison after being handed a minimum 30 year sentence, many are questioning why he wasn’t given a life sentence.

Last night, the convicted child abuser released an extraordinary recorded statement from his jail cell, insisting he is innocent and blaming a slew of people for orchestrating a conspiracy against him.

Completely in denial over the decades of depravity he visited upon vulnerable young boys in his care, Jerry Sandusky: “They can take away my life, they can make me out as a monster, they can treat me as a monster, but they can’t take away my heart.”

Aired on Penn State radio, the recording continued: “In my heart, I know I did not do these alleged disgusting acts.”

“Why have so many people suffered as a result of false allegations? What’s the purpose?”

Jerry Sandusky also said he is the victim of a “well-orchestrated effort of the media, investigators, the system, Penn State, psychologists, civil attorneys” to set him up and frame him for the crimes.

In particular, Jerry Sandusky blamed the boys who came forward with the accusations of seeking “information, attention and potential perks” and calls one boy “a veteran accuser [who] always sought attention”.

In what will be a tough to hear stream of consciousness for many, the convicted sex offender went as far as to suggest that his case would “maybe it will help others”.

“Some vulnerable children who could be abused might not be because of all the publicity,” Jerry Sandusky said.

“That would be nice, but I’m not sure about it. I would cherish the opportunity to become a candle for others, as they have been a light for me.

“My wife has been my only sex partner, and that was after marriage. Our love continues.”

Flanked by sheriff's deputies, Jerry Sandusky's bullet-proof vest can visibly be seen under his jumpsuit

Flanked by sheriff’s deputies, Jerry Sandusky’s bullet-proof vest can visibly be seen under his jumpsuit

Joe Amendola, Jerry Sandusky’s lawyer, said he will make similar claims in court today.

Nobody else is expected to speak on Jerry Sandusky’s behalf during the sentencing hearing in Bellefonte, defense attorney Joe Amendola said.

“What I anticipate he’ll say is that he’s innocent,” Joe Amendola said outside the courthouse yesterday.

The attorney said others, including Jerry Sandusky’s wife, have submitted letters on his behalf and that Dottie Sandusky stands by her husband and will attend the sentencing.

“He’s going to fight for a new trial,” Joe Amendola said.

He said “the important thing” about sentencing for the defense “is it starts the appellate process”.

Joe Amendola made the comments yesterday afternoon before he participated in a closed-door meeting with prosecutors and Judge John Cleland to discuss hearing logistics.

Lawyers for the attorney general’s office said they would comment to reporters after the meeting.

Sentencing is expected to begin with a hearing to determine if Jerry Sandusky qualifies as a sexually violent predator under Pennsylvania’s version of Megan’s Law, after which Sandusky will be sentenced.

Jerry Sandusky will likely spend the rest of his life in prison, given his age and serious nature of his convictions of which many carry mandatory minimum sentences of five or 10 years.

Assuming Judge John Cleland gives him at least two years – the minimum threshold for a state prison sentence – Jerry Sandusky’s first stop will be the Camp Hill state prison near Harrisburg, where all male inmates undergo a couple weeks of testing to determine such things as mental and physical health, education level and any treatment needs.

Prison officials will assign him a security level risk and decide which “home prison” to send him to.

Although Jerry Sandusky’s home in the Lemont area of State College is only a couple miles from Rockview state prison, there is no way to predict where he will end up.

Because of who he is and what he’s done, depending on what kind of facility he finds himself locked away in, Jerry Sandusky could be in particular danger of sexual assault when behind bars.

His lawyer, Joe Amendola, said he expects Jerry Sandusky will be housed with nonviolent offenders at a minimum-security prison, and the Pennsylvania Corrections Department said it is committed to the safety of all inmates, though it would not comment on what it plans to do to protect Sandusky.

With thousands of inmates raped in prison in the U.S. each year, statistics compiled by the federal government show that sex offenders are roughly two to four times more likely than other inmates to fall victim.

In some ways, Jerry Sandusky, who has been held in isolation in a county jail since he was found guilty in June, is not a prime target for assault. Inmates who are young and small in stature are more likely to be sexually victimized; Jerry Sandusky is a senior citizen with an imposing frame.

Other inmates at high risk include gay men, those who have been previously victimized and those seen as timid or feminine.

But a convicted sex offender who spent 10 years in prison, and who works with other released sex offenders through the Pennsylvania Prison Society, said Jerry Sandusky won’t be able to keep a low profile.

Jerry Sandusky speaks out from behind bars

I’m responding to the worst loss of my life.

First, I looked at myself. Over and over, I asked why? Why didn’t we have a fair opportunity to prepare for trial?

Why have so many people suffered as a result of false allegations? What’s the purpose? Maybe it will help others.

Some vulnerable children who could be abused might not be because of all the publicity. That would be nice, but I’m not sure about it.

I would cherish the opportunity to become a candle for others, as they have been a light for me.

They can take away my life, they can make me out as a monster, they can treat me as a monster, but they can’t take away my heart. In my heart, I know I did not do these alleged disgusting acts.

My wife has been my only sex partner, and that was after marriage. Our love continues.

A young man who was dramatic, a veteran accuser and always sought attention, started everything.

He was joined by a well-orchestrated effort of the media, investigators, the system, Penn State, psychologists, civil attorneys and other accusers. They won.

I’ve wondered what they really won: attention, financial gain, prestige – will all be temporary.

Before you blame me, as others have, look at everything and everybody. Look at the preparation for the trial and the trial. Compare it to others.

Think about what happened. Why, and who made it happen?

Evaluate the accusers and their families. Realize they didn’t come out of isolation. The accusers were products of many more people and experiences than me. Look at their confidants and their honesty.

Think about how easy it was for them to turn on me given the information, attention and potential perks. I never labeled or put down them or their families. I tried and I cared, then asked for the same.

Please realize all came to the Second Mile because of issues. Some of those may remain.

We will continue to fight. We didn’t lose the proven facts, evidence, accurate locations and times.

Anything can be said. We lost to speculation and stories that were influenced by people who wanted to convict me.

We must fight unfairness and consistency and dishonesty. People need to be portrayed for who they really are.

We’ve not been complainers. When we couldn’t have kids, we adopted. When we didn’t have time to prepare for a trial, we still gave it our best. We will fight for another chance.

We have given many second chances, and now we’ll ask for one. It will take more than our effort.

Justice will have to be more than just a word, fairness more than just a dream. It will take others: Somebody apolitical with the courage to listen, to think about the unfairness, to have the guts to stand up and take the road less traveled.

I ask for the strength to handle everything and willingness to surrender only to God, regardless of the outcome.

 

 

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Penn State football coach Joe Paterno, who died in January, is about to be immortalized in a new movie starring Hollywood legend Al Pacino.

Al Pacino has agreed to take on the controversial role in a film based on the New York Times bestselling book Paterno.

The movie is still in the early stages of development, but respected Hollywood entertainment blog deadline.com is reporting that it will be shopped around Los Angeles early next week.

Joe Paterno was fired for his alleged role in covering up the child molestation scandal involving assistant coach Jerry Sandusky who was revealed to be a pedophile.

His death came just two months after he was let go by Penn State in November of 2011.

Penn State football coach Joe Paterno is about to be immortalized in a new movie starring Al Pacino

Penn State football coach Joe Paterno is about to be immortalized in a new movie starring Al Pacino

The new book, which was penned by former Sports Illustrated columnist Joe Posnanski, takes an in depth look at Joe Paterno’s relationship with Jerry Sandusky.

Jerry Sandusky was convicted and awaits sentencing on child sexual abuse.

As the scandal erupted, it was revealed that Joe Paterno had been told by graduate assistant Mike McQueary that jerry Sandusky had raped a boy in the Penn State locker room showers.

In addition, an independent report conducted by former FBI director Louis Freeh, concluded that Joe Paterno, as well as other Penn State bigwigs, “failed to protect against a child sexual predator harming children for over a decade”.

Joe Posnanski’s book, however disputes those claims, saying that Joe Paterno did not know Jerry Sandusky had sexually abused children, and when he read the list of charges against Sandusky, he asked his son Scott: “What is sodomy, anyway?”

Jerry Sandusky was convicted in June of sexually assaulting 10 boys over 15 years.

 

Former Penn State University football coach Jerry Sandusky allegedly called the boy he was seen raping in a locker room shower and left him two sickening voicemail messages professing his love – ten years after the reported abuse occurred.

Victim 2, whose graphic abuse was the single most shocking revelation of the horrific sex abuse scandal, stepped forward on Thursday to sue the university.

His identity remains a secret, but to prove the truth behind his claims, he released a pair of voicemails from Jerry Sandusky, left just two months before his arrest on dozens of sex abuse charges.

“I would be very firm and express my feelings up front. There’s nothing, really, to hide so…” Jerry Sandusky says in a voicemail left for the alleged victim, now an adult, on September 12, 2011.

He ends with: “Take care, love you, hope you get this message.”

Jerry Sandusky called again September 19 and asks the man whether he wants to go to a Penn State Football game.

Again, the former coach ends the voicemail with “thanks, I love you”.

Former assistant coach Mike McQueary, who was a graduate assistant at the time, testified at Jerry Sandusky’s trial that he saw the victim, a 10-year-old boy, with his hands pinned to a shower wall and Sandusky standing behind him in 2001.

Jerry Sandusky allegedly called the boy he was seen raping in a locker room shower and left him two sickening voicemail messages professing his love

Jerry Sandusky allegedly called the boy he was seen raping in a locker room shower and left him two sickening voicemail messages professing his love

“I heard rhythmic slapping sounds, two or three slaps that sounded like skin on skin,” Mike McQueary testified.

“I believe Jerry was sexually molesting him and having some type of intercourse with him.”

Jurors convicted Jerry Sandusky of 45 out of 48 counts of sex abuse charges last month. He awaits sentencing.

Despite the horrifying testimony, Victim 2 was never identified by investigators and never testified at trial.

Now, his lawyers say, he is coming forward to hold the Penn State administrators who covered up his abuse accountable.

“Our client has to live the rest of his life not only dealing with the effects of Sandusky’s childhood sexual abuse, but also with the knowledge that many powerful adults, including those at the highest levels of Penn State, put their own interests and the interests of a child predator above their legal obligations to protect him,” the lawyers said in a news release.

The university said it was taking the case seriously but would not comment on pending litigation.

University President Rodney Erickson and the board of trustees “have publicly emphasized that their goal is to find solutions that rest on the principle of justice for the victims”, a school spokesman said.

The statement from the man’s attorneys said Victim 2 suffered “extensive sexual abuse over many years both before and after the 2002 incident Michael McQueary witnessed”.

McQueary, who estimated the boy to be around 10 years old, reported the abuse to school officials, including longtime coach Joe Paterno, but none of them told police.

In a recent report conducted by former FBI Director Louis Freeh and commissioned by Penn State, the investigators excoriated Joe Paterno and the other administrators for not attempting to identify Victim 2, saying it showed “a striking lack of empathy”.

Trustees fired Joe Paterno, who has since died, because he failed to do more about claims against Jerry Sandusky, and the scathing independent review said several top school officials looked the other way because they were afraid of bad publicity. The NCAA has vacated 112 Penn State wins.

Before the trial, defense attorney Joe Amendola said he had met with a man he believed he might be Victim 2 and the man told him he had not been abused by Sandusky. Joe Amendola said he was not convinced and did not intend to subpoena him, but also said Jerry Sandusky himself was insistent they had the right person.

The statement from Victim 2’s lawyers leaves many questions unanswered, including whether he had been in contact with prosecutors before or during the trial, whether he remembers Mike McQueary, and whether he is the same person who met with Joe Amendola.

“Jerry Sandusky’s abuse of Victim 2 and other children is a direct result of a conspiracy to conceal Sandusky’s conduct and the decisions by top Penn State officials that facilitated and enabled his access to victims,” the statement read.

“We intend to file a civil lawsuit against Penn State University and others and to hold them accountable for the egregious and reckless conduct that facilitated the horrific abuse our client suffered.”

The statement did not say when the lawsuit would be filed or contain details on what redress the plaintiff is seeking. The lawyers said they would not have further comment, and messages left for their spokesman were not immediately returned.

Several messages seeking comment from Joe Amendola and Jerry Sandusky’s other lawyer, Karl Rominger, were not immediately returned.

Prosecutors had said on several occasions they did not know the identity of the boy, and they offered no reaction to the lawyers’ announcement Thursday.

“We can’t comment, given both our ongoing criminal prosecutions and our ongoing investigation,” said Nils Frederiksen, spokesman for the attorney general’s office.

The attorneys who released the statement include several based in Philadelphia and in State College, home to Penn State’s main campus – where the shower assault took place. They also represent three other young men Sandusky was convicted of abusing but have not filed any lawsuits.

A second accuser has filed paperwork indicating an additional complaint is in the works, while other lawyers also have indicated they represent young men with potential claims.

This week Penn State’s general liability insurer sought to deny or limit coverage for Jerry Sandusky-related claims.

Pennsylvania Manufacturers’ Association Insurance argued that Penn State withheld key information needed to assess risk.

In June, after Jerry Sandusky was convicted, the university said it hoped to quickly compensate victims and would reach out to their lawyers. Penn State spokesman Dave La Torre declined to comment on anything related to the victims and any settlement discussions.

 

 

US college sport authorities have fined Penn State University $60 million in the wake of child sex abuse perpetrated by assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky.

Famous US football school Penn state University will be banned from competing for honors for four years, and lose all wins from 1998-2011.

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) said the punishments were “corrective and punitive”.

Assistant coach Jerry Sandusky was found guilty of 45 counts of sex abuse.

He abused 10 boys over a period of 15 years, a court found, judging him to have preyed on boys he met through a charity, Second Mile, that he founded himself.

Jerry Sandusky has not been sentenced but could spend the rest of his life in prison.

Penn State University was fined $60 million in the wake of child sex abuse perpetrated by Jerry Sandusky

Penn State University was fined $60 million in the wake of child sex abuse perpetrated by Jerry Sandusky

The NCAA said the fines were equivalent to the annual gross revenue of the Penn State football programme.

The money is to be given to an endowment funding external programmes to prevent child abuse and help victims.

“Football will never again be placed ahead of educating, nurturing and protecting young people,” NCAA President Mark Emmert said.

“The sanctions needed to reflect our goals of providing cultural change.”

Other NCAA sanctions against Penn State include:

• A ban on participating in post-season games – or playoffs – for four years, including the 2012-2013 season

• Number of football scholarships limited for the next four years, a reduction of 10 places per year

• Football wins revoked between 1998-2011

• A five-year probation on all sports at Penn State

• Adoption of all recommendations for reform in Section 10 of an FBI investigation into abuse at Penn State

• Appointment of an NCAA-selected Athletics Integrity Monitor for five years

• Further penalties against individuals could come after criminal proceedings end.

Correspondents say the sanctions are unprecedented in their severity, although the NCAA did not impose the “death penalty” and close the entire football programme.

The fallout from the scandal has sullied the reputation of Penn State’s former head football coach Joe Paterno.

Joe Paterno, who died earlier this year, months before the resolution of the case, won more college football games in his long career at Penn State than any other head coach in university sport.

He was heavily criticized in a report by former FBI Director Louis Freeh, issued after the guilty verdict, which said the highest-ranking officials at Penn State failed utterly to protect victims and potential victims from Jerry Sandusky.

Many of his wins will now be expunged from the record books.

On Sunday a statue of Joe Paterno was removed from outside the university, after it was deemed to have become a “lightning rod of controversy”.

 

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Fellow inmates locked up alongside Jerry Sandusky reportedly taunted him by singing “Hey, teacher, leave those kids alone” – a line from Pink Floyd’s Another Brick in the Wall – while he was awaiting trial.

Jerry Sandusky, who has returned to the Centre County Correctional Facility after being convicted of 45 out of 48 charges of child sex abuse, was first locked up in the jail last December.

While there, inmates taunted the disgraced Penn State football coach when the lights went out.

“At night, we were singing <<Hey, teacher, leave those kids alone>>,” one 22-year-old offender named Josh told The Daily.

Prisoners were banned from speaking directly to Jerry Sandusky, who was in a special unit reserved for sex offenders or people with mental illnesses.

Jerry Sandusky, who has returned to the Centre County Correctional Facility after being convicted of 45 out of 48 charges of child sex abuse, was first locked up in the jail last December

Jerry Sandusky, who has returned to the Centre County Correctional Facility after being convicted of 45 out of 48 charges of child sex abuse, was first locked up in the jail last December

They were aware of his offenses as they had access to television and newspapers, Josh added.

It suggests the hostile welcome Jerry Sandusky could have expected when he returned to the jail last week as he awaits sentencing.

The revelations come after Jerry Sandusky was found guilty of using his position at Penn State to coerce children into sex, raping them on university grounds or at his home.

But as he faces 442 years in prison, his legal team has raised an argument about his speedy trial that may become the thrust of an appeal.

Jerry sandusky’s lawyers have revealed that they tried to throw in the towel as the trial began because they had too little time to prepare.

 

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Jerry Sandusky has been found guilty of sexually abusing young boys while he was an assistant coach of the Penn State football team.

Jerry Sandusky, 68, was convicted of 45 of the counts against him, and acquitted of a further three.

He is now headed to jail where he will be placed on suicide watch and could face a total sentence of up to 442 years in prison.

Jurors were sequestered for just two days while they deliberated the verdict.

The conviction of Jerry Sandusky finally brings an end to a horrific saga which has trashed the reputation of a leading public university and ended the career of its president as well as its legendary head coach, Joe Paterno, who died of cancer in January.

After the verdict was announced in the courtroom in Bellefonte, Pennsylvania, Jerry Sandusky’s bail was revoked and he was taken to the Center County Correctional Facility.

Jerry Sandusky plans to appeal against his conviction, according to one of his defense lawyers.

He showed little emotion as the verdict was read. The judge ordered him to be taken to the county jail to await sentencing in about three months.

In court, Jerry Sandusky half-waved toward family as the sheriff led him away. Outside, he calmly walked to a sheriff’s car with his hands cuffed in front of him.

As he was placed in the car, someone yelled at him to “rot in hell”. Others hurled insults and he shook his head in response.

Jerry Sandusky was accompanied by his wife Dottie as they took a break from the courthouse during deliberations on Friday

Jerry Sandusky was accompanied by his wife Dottie as they took a break from the courthouse during deliberations on Friday

Defense attorney Joe Amendola said Jerry Sandusky was disappointed by the verdict.

Meanwhile, Pennsylvania Attorney General Linda Kelly thanked the accusers who testified, calling them “brave men”.

She says the trial was forced on them and that she hoped the verdict “helps these victims heal… and helps other victims of abuse to come forward”.

Almost immediately after the judge adjourned, loud cheers could be heard from at least a couple of hundred people gathered outside the courthouse as word quickly spread that Jerry Sandusky had been convicted.

Eight young men testified in a central Pennsylvania courtroom about a range of abuse.

For two other alleged victims, prosecutors relied on testimony from a university janitor and then-graduate assistant Mike McQueary.

Jerry Sandusky did not take the stand in his own defense.

After the verdict was announced, defense attorney Karl Rominger said it was “a tough case” with a lot of charges and that an appeal was certain. He said the defense team “didn’t exactly have a lot of time to prepare”.

Jerry Sandusky’s former employer, Penn State, which has been dealt a damaging blow to its reputation by the scandal, released a statement after his conviction was announced.

“The legal process has spoken and we have tremendous respect for the men who came forward to tell their stories publicly,” the university said.

“No verdict can undo the pain and suffering caused by Mr. Sandusky, but we do hope this judgment helps the victims and their families along their path to healing.”

The statement added that Penn State had “established a confidential counseling process for victims of Mr. Sandusky’s conduct” and taken other steps to stamp out sexual abuse on campus.

In an apparent attempt to limit the institution’s legal liabilities in the light of the verdict, the statement continued: “The University plans to invite victims of Mr. Sandusky’s abuse to participate in a programme to facilitate the resolution of claims against the University arising out of Mr. Sandusky’s conduct.”

The ex-coach had repeatedly denied the allegations, and his defense suggested that his accusers had a financial motive to make up stories, years after the fact.

His attorney also painted Jerry Sandusky as the victim of overzealous police investigators who coached the alleged victims into giving accusatory statements.

Jerry Sandusky had initially faced 52 counts of sex abuse. The judge dropped four counts during the trial, saying two were unproven, one was brought under a statute that didn’t apply and another was duplicative.

Earlier on Friday, his lead defense attorney told reporters that he would be stunned and “probably die of a heart attac” if his client were acquitted of all 48 counts.

The impromptu remarks by Joe Amendola lasted about 15 minutes inside the courtroom and opened a wide window into the defendant’s state of mind as he and Dottie Sandusky anxiously awaited a verdict.

Joe Amendola said that in anticipation of a verdict, the Sanduskys were spending a lot of time praying. He described the atmosphere at their home as funereal.

On Friday, jurors listened again to testimony from a key prosecution witness against the former Penn State assistant football coach, then went back behind closed doors for a second day of deliberations.

The jury had talked for more than eight hours on Thursday before adjourning at the end of a long session that featured dueling portrayals of Jerry Sandusky as either a “predatory pedophile” or the victim of a conspiracy between investigators and his accusers.

 

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Travis Weaver became the first alleged Jerry Sandusky victim to reveal himself to the public, saying in an interview that he was sexually abused by former Penn State assistant coach more than 100 times, starting when he was just ten.

Travis Weaver, a 30-year-old Ohio man, said Jerry Sandusky preyed on him after he and his brother went to a summer camp for the Second Mile, a charity the coach founded and through which he is accused of cultivating most of his victims

The revelation comes on the same day as a jury begins to deliberate Jerry Sandusky’s fate on 48 counts of sexual abuse charges.

In closing arguments, his attorney said the accusers were liars who were hoping to cash in on legal settlements from the university.

Travis Weaver is not one of the eight accusers who testified at trial, but he did tell his story to the grand jury that handed down the Sandusky’s indictment, NBC News reported.

An exclusive interview with Travis Weaver will air at 10:00 p.m. Thursday on Rock Center.

Travis Weaver became the first alleged Jerry Sandusky victim to reveal himself to the public

Travis Weaver became the first alleged Jerry Sandusky victim to reveal himself to the public

When asked what he would do if he ever met Jerry Sandusky again, Travis Weaver doesn’t hesitate: “I’d punch him in his mouth.”

“There would be no reason to say anything. He knows what he did.”

During the sex abuse trial, Jerry Sandusky’s lawyer Joe Amendola said the former coach is being railroaded by overzealous investigators and prosecutors.

He strenuously denied that accusations and Sandusky has maintained his innocence since his arrest last fall.

Joe Amendola said the accusers were greedy and they lied about the abuse in the hopes of winning big payouts from Penn State University so they could drive new cars and buy big houses.

Travis Weaver has also filed a lawsuit and is being represented by a well-known attorney who has specialized in sex abuse cases against the Catholic church.

The abuse began in 1992, Travis Weaver told NBC’s Rock Center, when he met Jerry Sandusky at a swimming pool at a camp sponsored by the Second Miles, which Sandusky founded to help at-risk young boys.

“It was like meeting my hero,” Travis Weaver said of Jerry Sandusky, who was once the top pick to replace legendary Penn State football coach Joe Paterno.

The individual attention Jerry Sandusky gave Travis Weaver began innocently, but gradually grew more and more sinister, he said.

It began with a shower in the Penn State football team’s locker room.

“After the shower was over… he’d dry me off with a towel. He’d say he was trying to wrestle with me…” Travis Weaver told NBC.

He always assumed he was the only victim, he said.

He never imagined there have been other boys until Jerry Sandusky was arrested last fall.

Travis Weaver also blasted Jerry Sandusky’s wife, Dottie, who testified that she never saw or heard anything that would have made her think her husband was molesting boys.

He said the abuse continued for four years until he moved away to Ohio to flee Jerry Sandusky.

 

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Matt Sandusky, the adopted son of Jerry Sandusky, has dramatically accused the former Penn State coach of abuse as a jury deliberates over scores of sex abuse charges against him.

A lawyer for Matt Sandusky said the man told authorities that the former Penn State assistant football coach abused him.

Matt Sandusky, 33, is one of Jerry Sandusky’s six adopted children.

His lawyers, Andrew Shubin and Justine Andronici, issued a statement on Thursday naming Matt Sandusky and saying that he had been prepared to testify on behalf of prosecutors at his father’s sex abuse trial.

The statement says Matt Sandusky is “a victim of Jerry Sandusky’s abuse”, but doesn’t go into specifics.

NBC News reported that Matt Sandusky was to take the stand as a “rebuttal witness” if Jerry Sandusky testified.

Jerry Sandusky’s defense team ultimately decided the 68-year-old former coach wouldn’t speak in his own defense.

Matt Sandusky, the adopted son of Jerry Sandusky, has dramatically accused the former Penn State coach of abuse as a jury deliberates over scores of sex abuse charges against him

Matt Sandusky, the adopted son of Jerry Sandusky, has dramatically accused the former Penn State coach of abuse as a jury deliberates over scores of sex abuse charges against him

Matt Sandusky’s attorney’s told the network: “This has been an extremely painful experience for Matt and he has asked us to convey his request that the media respect his privacy.”

The statement came after jurors began deliberating 48 charges against the ex-coach.

Prosecutors say Jerry Sandusky met the 10 sex-abuse victims through his charity, The Second Mile, which he established in 1977.

Matt Sandusky’s lawyer says his client met with investigators very recently.

Matt Sandusky went to live with Jerry Sandusky and his wife, Dottie, as a foster child and was adopted by them as an adult.

Shortly after Jerry Sandusky’s arrest in November, Matt Sandusky’s ex-wife Jill Jones successfully obtained a restraining order forbidding the children from sleeping at their grandparents’ home.

At about the same time, details emerged that Matt Sandusky had attempted suicide just four months after first going to live with Jerry and Dottie Sandusky in 1995.

He had come into the home through The Second Mile charity, and was first a foster child before being legally adopted.

His name also came up last week during the testimony of one of Jerry Sandusky’s ten accusers.

The man, dubbed Victim 4 by prosecutors, said Matt Sandusky was living at the Sandusky home on an occasion when he had stayed there overnight.

When asked by prosecutors whether Jerry Sandusky ever engaged him in a soap battle in the showers, he recounted a time when he and Matt Sandusky had been playing racket ball.

When they were done, he said, they went back to a locker room. Matt got undressed and got into the shower and then Victim 4 and Jerry Sandusky followed him in there, he testified.

“Me and Jerry came in. He started pumping his hand full of soap,” he said.

At that point, Matt Sandusky shut off his shower and left and went to another locker room to shower, the witness said.

Asked by prosecutors about Matt’s facial expression when the soap battles started, he replied: “Nervous.”

Jerry and Dottie Sandusky married in 1966 and have no biological children together, but adopted six times and have served as foster parents.

The news comes just hours after Travis Weaver, a 30-year-old Ohio man, became the first alleged Jerry Sandusky victim to reveal himself to the public, saying in an interview that he was sexually abused by Jerry Sandusky more than 100 times, starting when he was just ten.

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