Home World U.S. News Charlottesville Protests: Governor Terry McAuliffe Blames White Supremacists for City Violence

Charlottesville Protests: Governor Terry McAuliffe Blames White Supremacists for City Violence

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Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe has said that his only message for the white supremacists who brought chaos to the city of Charlottesville is “Go home”.

On August 12, a woman has been killed and 19 people were injured when a car rammed a crowd of people opposing a far-right rally there.

The FBI has opened a civil rights investigation into the incident.

Earlier, street brawls erupted between white nationalists and counter-protesters.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions said “the violence and deaths in Charlottesville strike at the heart of American law and justice.

He said: “When such actions arise from racial bigotry and hatred, they betray our core values and cannot be tolerated.”

The alleged driver of the car – James Alex Fields, 20, from Ohio – is in detention on suspicion of second-degree murder.

In addition to those injured in the car incident, the Charlottesville Police Department said 15 were wounded in other violence related to the far-right march.

Late in the afternoon, a Virginia State Police helicopter crashed in woodland south-west of the city, killing two police officers. The helicopter had been part of the operation to monitor the clashes.

The “Unite the Right” march was called to protest against plans to remove a statue of General Robert E. Lee, who had fought for the pro-slavery Confederacy during the US Civil War.

Image source Getty Images

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Governor McAuliffe told a press conference: “I have a message for all the white supremacists, and the Nazis who came into Charlottesville today. Our message is plain and simple: Go home. You are not wanted in this great commonwealth. Shame on you. You pretend that you’re patriots, but you are anything but a patriot.

“You came here today to hurt people. And you did hurt people. But my message is clear: We are stronger than you.”


The Democrat governor said he had spoken to President Donald Trump, and twice urged him to begin a movement to bring people together.

Terry McAuliffe thanked the police and law enforcement officials, who he said had prevented “a much worse day”, and praised the emergency services who helped the wounded.

The violence in Charlottesville – a liberal college town – is a stark demonstration of the growing political divide in the United States, which has intensified since President Trump’s election last year.

Right-wing blogger Jason Kessler had called for a “pro-white” rally, and white nationalists promoted the gathering widely.

Oren Segal, director of the Anti-Defamation League’s Center on Extremism, said several “white power” groups were present – including neo-Nazis and factions of the Ku Klux Klan.

The New York Times reports that some were chanting “You will not replace us,” and “Jew will not replace us.”

Anti-racism organizations such as Black Lives Matter held protests at the scene.

On August 11, the white nationalists held lit torches and chanted “White lives matter” as they marched through the University of Virginia in the city.

President Trump condemned “in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry, and violence on many sides”.

Speaking in New Jersey, where he is on a working holiday, President Trump told reporters: “The hate and the division must stop right now.

“We have to come together as Americans with love for our nation.”