Home Business Economy & Politics Donald Trump: “Let ObamaCare Die on Its Own”

Donald Trump: “Let ObamaCare Die on Its Own”


The new Republican healthcare policy should be to allow ObamaCare to collapse, said President Donald Trump.

He told reporters of the current healthcare law: “I’m not going to own it.”

“I can tell you the Republicans are not going to own it.”

Support for the Republican Senate bill fell apart on July 17 when two more senators said they could not back it.

Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer said President Trump was “playing a dangerous game” with the US healthcare system.

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He said on July 18: “He is actively, actively trying to undermine the healthcare system in this country using millions of Americans as political pawns in a cynical game.”


Republican Senate leader Mitch McConnell said the chamber would vote early next week on a motion for repealing ObamaCare only.

However, with at least three Republicans against the plan B, it is probably doomed, too.

Donald Trump backed the just-repeal-it plan on July 17 but changed his tune on the next day by proposing to simply let ObamaCare – which has failed to curb rising costs as insurance options dwindle – die on its own.

“As I have always said, let ObamaCare fail and then come together and do a great healthcare plan. Stay tuned!” the president tweeted.

Donald Trump has invited all Republican senators to discuss healthcare over lunch at the White House on July 19.

Without a replacement bill, analysts have estimated that millions of people would lose health insurance.

The GOP’s proposed alternative includes steep cuts to Medicaid, a healthcare program for the poor and disabled, removed the individual mandate requiring all Americans to have health insurance or pay a tax penalty and implemented a six-month lockout period for anyone who lets their health coverage lapse for more than two months.

The House of Representatives passed a similar version of the Senate bill, but slashed taxes on the wealthy used to pay for the health scheme. The Senate proposed a similar provision but was forced to ditch it amid opposition.