Home Breaking News RJ Reynolds to pay $23.6 billion to smoker widow

RJ Reynolds to pay $23.6 billion to smoker widow


RJ Reynolds Tobacco Company – America’s second largest cigarette company – has been ordered by a Florida court to pay $23.6 billion to the wife of a smoker who died of lung cancer.

RJ Reynolds was hit with the punitive fine in addition to $16.8 million in compensatory damages.

Cynthia Robinson took action against RJ Reynolds in 2008, seeking compensation for her husband’s death in 1996.

An official at the company said the court’s verdict was “far beyond the realm of reasonableness and fairness”.

RJ Reynolds Tobacco Company has been ordered by a Florida court to pay $23.6 billion to the wife of a smoker who died of lung cancer

RJ Reynolds Tobacco Company has been ordered by a Florida court to pay $23.6 billion to the wife of a smoker who died of lung cancer

During the four-week trial, lawyers for Cynthia Robinson argued that RJ Reynolds was negligent in informing consumers of the dangers of consuming tobacco.

This negligence, the lawyers said, led to her husband Michael Johnson Sr. contracting lung cancer from smoking after becoming “addicted” and failing multiple attempts to quit.

“RJ Reynolds took a calculated risk by manufacturing cigarettes and selling them to consumers without properly informing them of the hazards,” Cynthia Robinson’s lawyer Willie Gary said.

“We hope that this verdict will send a message to RJ Reynolds and other big tobacco companies that will force them to stop putting the lives of innocent people in jeopardy,” he added.

RJ Reynolds plans to appeal against the court’s decision, vice president and assistant general counsel Jeffery Raborn said in a statement.

“This verdict goes far beyond the realm of reasonableness and fairness, and is completely inconsistent with the evidence presented,” Jeffery Raborn said.

The punitive damages awarded to Cynthia Robinson were said to be the largest of any individual case stemming from a class action lawsuit filed in Florida.

Several similar cases have resulted in smaller payouts after the state’s highest court ruled that smokers and their families only had to prove addiction and that smoking caused their illness.

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Clyde is a business graduate interested in writing about latest news in politics and business. He enjoys writing and is about to publish his first book. He’s a pet lover and likes to spend time with family. When the time allows he likes to go fishing waiting for the muse to come.