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US foreign-born population is at the highest percentage since 1920

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A new report by the U.S. Census Bureau shows that 40 million foreign-born people were living in the country in 2010 – the highest percentage of the total population since 1920.

Just a decade earlier, only 31 million people, or 11% of the population, residing in the country were born elsewhere.

While foreign-born residents resided in every state, more than half lived in just the “gateway” states: California, New York, Texas and Florida.

The report was based on the 2010 American Community Survey, a poll of 3 million American households.

More than half (53%) of all foreign-born residents were from Latin America and the Caribbean, according to the report.

By comparison, just 28% of the foreign-born population was born in Asia, 12% in Europe, 4% in Africa, 2% in Northern America and less than 1% in Oceania.

While foreign-born residents resided in every state, more than half lived in just the “gateway” states, California, New York, Texas and Florida

While foreign-born residents resided in every state, more than half lived in just the “gateway” states, California, New York, Texas and Florida

Forty-four percent of all foreign-born residents were naturalized citizens.

While foreign-born residents resided in every state, more than half lived in just four states: California (25%), New York (11%), Texas (10%) and Florida (9%).


At least one in four (27%) residents in California was foreign-born.

New York, Texas and California are traditional “gateway” states for immigrants.

West Virginia had the smallest percentage, with just 1% born outside the U.S.

The new report by the census bureau revealed new information about the size of foreign-born households, their median incomes, and whether or not they lived above or below the poverty line.

According to the report, foreign-born people were more likely to be employed than native-born Americans: 68% versus 64%.

However, those people born outside the country were less likely to have health insurance and more likely to live below the poverty line.

Just 66% of the foreign-born population had health insurance, compared with 87% of the native population.

The median household income of foreign born households was $46,224 while native households made $50,541.